“Our Own Flesh and Blood”?: Racial Identity and Community in the Ohio Country, 1772-1818 | Newberry

“Our Own Flesh and Blood”?: Racial Identity and Community in the Ohio Country, 1772-1818

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

5:30 pm to 7:30 pm

TFL

Jennifer Miller, West Virginia University
American Indian Studies Seminar Series

Christianized Indians, pacifist Moravians, and acculturated captives all occupied a tenuous position in the eighteenth century, caught between the “white” world and the Indian one. The Moravian mission towns in the Ohio country hovered in not only the geographic borderlands but in the social borderlands as well. These missions offer a glimpse into how late eighteen-century peoples – both Native and European – worked to create alternative gender, racial, and religious identities at a time when these categories were growing increasingly inflexible. This paper will focus on Peggy Conner, who was born the daughter of German immigrants, adopted by the Shawnee, and raised her five children in the multi-ethnic and multi-racial mission towns in the Great Lakes region.

Cost and Registration Information 

AIS seminar papers are pre-circulated electronically two weeks prior to the seminar date. Email mcnickle@newberry.org to request a copy of the paper. Please do not request a paper if you do not plan to attend.