To see a World in a Grain of Sand: Teaching Close Reading With Really Short Poems | Newberry

To see a World in a Grain of Sand: Teaching Close Reading With Really Short Poems

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

9:30 am to 12:30 pm

The Newberry

Dr. Eric Selinger, DePaul University
Full. Waitlist only.
Newberry Teachers' Consortium

Really short poems-just one, two, three, or four lines long-are a superb resource for teaching the art of close reading. Because they’re so short, they ease the anxiety students often have about poetry as an art form, and they can be integrated into a longer class period as a “warm-up” or “cool-down” exercise, helping teachers cultivate close reading as a habit. By the time students reach longer poems-six lines! Eight lines! A whole sonnet!-they’re ready to break them down into smaller, more approachable sections, and to make the kind of precise, detailed, and well-supported claims that characterize good close readers, not just of poetry, but of any type of writing. This class will equip teachers with a sheaf of classic and contemporary poems to teach, none more than nine lines long. It will also offer some handy, accessible terms and conceptual models that students can use to make any poem more interesting, whether as a character study, as a verbal contraption, or as part of a cultural conversation.

Cost and Registration Information 

Newberry Teachers’ Consortium members may register for this seminar through their designated membership contact as space permits. Non-member educators may register for this seminar by purchasing an individual membership at the time of registration. Registration for all NTC seminars opens Wednesday, September 6, 2017. For more information about NTC membership, please contact Charlotte Ross, Teacher Programs Manager, at rossc@newberry.org.

The seminar will be followed by a catered lunch. Registrants should RSVP for lunch to assist Teacher Programs staff in reducing waste.

A link to the assigned pre-readings for this seminar will be distributed to participants via email.

If you believe you are registered for this seminar but have not received an email confirmation or reminder, please contact Teacher Programs staff.