History and Story in Don Quixote

Chicago Teachers as Scholars
Thursday, October 24, 2013 to Friday, October 25, 2013
Dr. Glen Carman, DePaul University

Often considered the “first modern novel,” Miguel de Cervantes’s masterpiece is, among other things, a supreme example of how fiction can serve as a testing ground on which to explore the problems of nonfictional representation. In this seminar we will examine how Don Quixote explores the acts of reading and writing history. At the same time, we will analyze the text itself as a historical document, in particular one that treats such topics as censorship and the Spanish Inquisition; the literary and social roles of early modern women; and the “just-war” debate, especially as it relates to the chivalric ideal. We will focus on portions of the first (1605) and second (1615) parts of the work (in English translation), and also consider how illustrators have interpreted relevant episodes. Taking advantage of the Newberry’s rich holdings in the field, we will view important editions of the Quixote, as well as rare editions of books that formed part of Don Quixote’s library

Cost and registration information: 

For registration information, please contact Charlotte Wolfe Ross at wolfec@newberry.org

*There will be a follow-up lesson planning workshop as well as an end of the year wrap-up session in addition to the two-day seminar.

See More Like This