Between Past and Presence: Settler Masculine Imaginings and Settler-Indigenous Encounters in Waawayeyaattanong (Detroit), 1871-1922 | Newberry

Between Past and Presence: Settler Masculine Imaginings and Settler-Indigenous Encounters in Waawayeyaattanong (Detroit), 1871-1922

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

5:30 pm to 7:30 pm

TFL

Kyle Mays, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
American Indian Studies Seminar Series

During the late 19th and early part of the 20th centuries, elite white men were on a quest to define their masculinity, race and their claim to Detroit as a modern place. And indigeneity was the medium through which the processes of modernization occurred. In this chapter, I argue that elite whites deployed indigeneity to both memorialize and erase Indigenous people from Detroit. However, Indigenous travelers such as Hunkapapa Lakota Sitting Bull and the frequent visitors from Walpole First Nations reserve disrupted elites’ ideas about indigeneity, modernity and the idea that Indigenous people were a vanishing race.

Cost and Registration Information 

AIS seminar papers are pre-circulated electronically two weeks prior to the seminar date. Email mcnickle@newberry.org to request a copy of the paper. Please do not request a paper if you do not plan to attend.