The Great War and the Origins of Humanitarianism, 1918-1924 | Newberry

The Great War and the Origins of Humanitarianism, 1918-1924

The Red Cross pictured sentimental images of the Great War's tragic consequences. Case Wing oversize D522.25 .W67 1914 no. 60.

The Red Cross pictured sentimental images of the Great War’s tragic consequences. Case Wing oversize D522.25 .W67 1914 no. 60.

Bruno Cabanes

An Exhibition Lecture
Thursday, December 4, 2014

6:30 pm

Alliance Française de Chicago, 810 N. Dearborn St., Chicago, IL

Speaker: Bruno Cabanes
Exhibitions

Bruno Cabanes, a historian of twentieth-century Europe, will give an illustrated talk on the aftermath of the Great War, which brought the most troubled peacetime the world had ever seen. Survivors of the war were not only the soldiers who fought, the wounded in mind and body. They were also the stateless, the children who suffered war’s consequences, and later the victims of the great Russian famine of 1921 to 1923. Before the phrases ‘universal human rights’ and ‘non-governmental organization’ even existed, five remarkable men and women–René Cassin and Albert Thomas from France, Fridtjof Nansen from Norway, Herbert Hoover from the United States, and Eglantyne Jebb from Britain–understood that a new type of transnational organization was needed to face problems that respected no national boundaries or rivalries.

Bruno Cabanes is the Donald G. & Mary A. Dunn Chair in Modern Military History at the Ohio State University. His publications include La victoire endeuillée: La sortie de guerre des soldats français (1918-1920), which was awarded the 2004 Gustave Chaix d’Est Ange Prize by the Académie des Sciences Morales et Politiques, Paris and shortlisted for the Augustin-Thierry Prize for the Best Book of the Year in 2004.

This program is cosponsored with the Newberry Library and the Alliance Française de Chicago.

Cost and Registration Information 

This program is free and no reservations are required.
Please note: this program will be held at the Alliance Française de Chicago (810 N. Dearborn St., Chicago, IL), not at the Newberry Library.