Righting the Histories, Writing the Stories

Literary History in the Works of LeAnne Howe
Center for American Indian Studies Programs
American Indian Studies Seminar Series
Wednesday, December 12, 2012

5:30 pm to 6:30 pm

TFL

Lisa J. Udel, Illinois College

Insisting that history must be understood as a series of subjective interpretations of events, Choctaw writer LeAnne Howe changes canonized histories, rewriting and narrating those events to propose reconsidered Choctaw subjectivities. Employing Raymond Fogelson’s notion of “pseudo-events” to explore contested interpretations of and responses to history, Howe characterizes her approach as “an ethical Native literary praxis [where the] Native writer remains in conversation with the past and the present to create a future” (“Blind Bread” 338). Howe’s process of righting history reflects and creates tribal imaginations that enrich the present with an understanding of the numerous pasts and informed imaginings of possible futures.

Cost and registration information: 

AIS seminar papers are pre-circulated electronically two weeks prior to the seminar date. Email mcnickle@newberry.org to request a copy of the paper. Please do not request a paper unless you plan to attend.