2008-2009 Newberry Seminar in Early American History and Culture

2008-2009 Seminars

Thursday, September 25, 2008
Early American History Seminar: Ann Keating, North Central College

“Chicago in Indian Country: The Murder of Jean B. Lalime”
Ann Keating, North Central College

Thursday, October 23, 2008
Early American History Seminar: Andrew Wehrman, Northwestern University

“The Siege of ‘Castle Pox’: Marblehead, Massachusetts’ Medical Revolution, 1764–1777”
Andrew Wehrman, Northwestern University

Thursday, November 13, 2008
Early American History Seminar: Kelly A. Ryan, Indiana University Southeast

“The Sexual Management of Race: Patriarchy and the Denial of Citizenship to Africans and Indians, 1740–1774”
Kelly A. Ryan, Indiana University Southeast

Thursday, January 15, 2009
Early American History Seminar: John Reda, University of Illinois at Chicago

“From Tippecanoe to Portage des Sioux: The Wars of 1812 in the Early American West”
John Reda, University of Illinois at Chicago

Thursday, February 19, 2009
Early American History Seminar: Kirsten Sword, Indiana University

“Submit or Starve? Two Seventeenth-Century Marriages and the Making of a Precedent”
Kirsten Sword, Indiana University

Thursday, March 26, 2009
Early American History Seminar: Edward Gray, Florida State University

“The Architect and the State: Tom Paine’s Iron Bridge, from Common Sense to Rights of Man
Edward Gray, Florida State University

Thursday, April 16, 2009
Early American History Seminar: Jordan Alexander Stein, University of Colorado at Boulder

“Edward Taylor’s Voice”
Jordan Alexander Stein, University of Colorado at Boulder

Thursday, May 21, 2009
Early American History Seminar: James Robertson, University of the West Indies at Mona

“Fighting Jamaica’s First Maroon War: Soldiers’ Journals and the Nature of Colonial Campaigning”
James Robertson, University of the West Indies at Mona

Thursday, June 11, 2009
Early American History Seminar: Patricia Rogers, Michigan State University

“’We Waite Impatiently to Hear’: The Intersections of Boundaries, Loyalties, and Commercial Activities in the Revolutionary Atlantic”
Patricia Rogers, Michigan State University