Moral Philosophy 101: Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics

"Aristotelis Stagiritae De moribus ad Nicomachum libri decem..." 1566. Wing ZP 538.O57.
"Aristotelis Stagiritae De moribus ad Nicomachum libri decem..." 1566. Wing ZP 538.O57.
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Wednesdays, September 17 - November 19

2 - 4 pm

Led by Thomas Zebrowski

Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics is one of the most influential textbooks of moral philosophy ever written. Celebrated in antiquity, canonized in the Middle Ages, and widely rejected in the Early Modern period, Aristotle’s ethical theory is undergoing a resurgence today. This seminar offers a close reading of the Ethics, moving through the great themes that engaged its author: the good, happiness, virtue, action and contemplation, justice, pleasure, friendship, and the golden mean. For the first session, please read the Translator’s Preface, Introduction and Book I of the Ostwald translation of Nicomachean Ethics

Thomas Zebrowski holds a PhD in religious ethics from the University of Chicago Divinity School and has taught seminars at the Newberry on philosophical, religious, and literary topics.

Materials List

Required Text(s):

  • Aristotle. Nicomachean Ethics. Translated with an Introduction and Notes by Martin Ostwald. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey. 1999. ISBN-13: 978-0023895302

Readings for the First Session:

  • For the first session, please read the Translator’s Preface, Introduction and Book I of the Ostwald translation of Nicomachean Ethics.

CPDU credit for this course is available for Illinois teachers seeking recertification. For more information see the Registration Information page.

This class is part of the Newberry’s Adult Education Seminars Program.

Cost and registration information: 

Ten sessions, $230.
Register Online.