March 2012

Thursday, January 5, 2012 to Tuesday, March 27, 2012
Border Troubles in the War of 1812

Today most Americans remember the War of 1812 for inspiring Francis Scott Key to write “The Star Spangled Banner.” Many of the conflict’s most familiar events—the battle of New Orleans, impressment of American sailors into the British Navy, and the British assault on Washington D.C.—took place far away from the Great Lakes.

Thursday, March 1, 2012
The Great American Novels of Willa Cather

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Willa Cather moved to Nebraska at age 9, hated it, and only grew to value the West once she relocated to a big city and began to write. We will survey her great novels, from My Ántonia to Death Comes for the Archbishop. Cather’s vision of the frontier is revelatory: polyglot, musical, shimmering with culture.

Thursday, March 1, 2012
Transforming Autobiography into Fiction

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Memoir and fiction writers draw on the same sources for inspiration: experience, observation, and point of view. They use their skills to express private visions in a universal art form. Through a series of writing exercises, participants will re-create their experiences, re-examine their points of view, and use fiction techniques to expand their discoveries into finished work.

Thursday, March 1, 2012
Fundamentals of Music

2 – 3:30 pm

Clefs, time signature, key signature, major and minor scales, chords, rhythms, intervals, accidentals, and enharmonic tones: we will examine these and many other foundational music concepts to help participants develop their musical knowledge and increase their listening pleasure.

Thursday, March 1, 2012
The Latin Roots of the Romance Language Family Tree

5:45 – 7:45 pm

This course in beginning Latin offers something not usually found in introductory level classes—a brief sketch of both the ancient roots and the modern branches of a linguistic family tree.

Thursday, March 1, 2012
Music of America’s Wars

2 – 4 pm

It is ironic that war has inspired so much beautiful music. Marches, patriotic songs, sentimental ballads, concert works, victory pieces, laments, protest songs, and Broadway musicals have emerged from wartime. This seminar focuses on American music written during the Revolution, Civil War, World War I, World War II, and the Vietnam War.

Thursday, March 1, 2012
Western Mysticism: St. John of the Cross

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Western mysticism begins in antiquity and extends into modern times, reaching in John of the Cross perhaps its clearest, most radiant moment. As Jacques Maritain wrote, in John “everything takes on that straining of earth toward heaven, like the figures in a painting by El Greco.” We will read three of his greatest works—The Ascent of Mt.

Thursday, March 1, 2012
Changing Gender Roles in the United States

6 – 7:30 pm

We will delve into the history of women in twentieth-century America, with a backwards glance to the Victorian Era. We will study the history of women’s roles in the public and private spheres, as well as essential issues in women’s history, including the history of feminism, birth control, suffrage, civil rights, and sexual violence.

Friday, March 2, 2012
Dante Lecture
Zygmunt Baranski : What Is So New about Dante's Vita nova?

2 pm

The lecture attempts to define and account for the innovative literary features of Dante’s youthful masterpiece, the Vita nova. In particular, it examines its primary sources, its structure, and its imposing metaliterary and self-reflective character.

A reception will follow the lecture.

Saturday, March 3, 2012
Writing the Unexpected: Poetry Workshop

1 – 3 pm

The Newberry Library’s resources will be a source for inspiration, information, conversation, and playfulness in this generative workshop. We will use visual art, historical texts, and ephemera to listen, experiment with form, and create new work. Along the way we will attend to the craft of poetry, learning tricks and tips from published pieces.

Saturday, March 3, 2012
French Literature Between Two Wars

10 am – Noon

The trauma of the First World War, combined with the influence of Freudian ideas and other cultural upheavals, dramatically shaped French writers, as well as other European literary voices.

Saturday, March 3, 2012
More Elements of Creative Writing

1 – 3 pm

Characters, plot, imagery, suspense, and conflict are just some of the elements of creative writing. This supportive yet challenging workshop, a continuation of the popular Elements of Creative Writing seminar, is open to writers at all levels, whether or not they have taken the previous course.

Saturday, March 3, 2012
Meet the Author: Gary B. Nash, Tadeusz Kosciuszko and Agrippa Hull: An Untold Story of a Momentous American Revolutionary Bond

1 pm

Tadeusz Kosciuszko, celebrated on both sides of the Atlantic in the age of democratic revolutions, forged comradeships with several African Americans with unusual and under-studied results.

Saturday, March 3, 2012
Jane Austen’s World: Society, Politics, and Culture in Regency England

10 am – Noon

To enhance enjoyment of Jane Austen’s novels, this course will survey English society in the late Georgian period.

Saturday, March 3, 2012
Extraterrestrials in Western Thought from Copernicus to H. G. Wells

1 – 3 pm

Opinion about the existence of intelligent extraterrestrial life has a long history in Western thought. Since at least the fifth century BCE, the debate has engaged a surprising number of philosophers, theologians, literary figures, and scientists.

Saturday, March 3, 2012
Genealogy and Local History Orientation

9:30 am

The Genealogy and Local History staff will introduce novices to the basics of research at an informal orientation. After the session, you are welcome to begin your research. A reference librarian will be available to provide suggestions and assistance. Reservations not required.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012
Shakespeare’s Histories

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Shakespeare’s histories deal with fascinating problems: the nature of kingship, violent personal and political conflict, the use and misuse of power. While raising these profound issues, Shakespeare enriches the plays with a gallery of memorable characters, among them Richard II, Richard III, Henry IV, Prince Hal, Hotspur, and the unforgettable Sir John Falstaff.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012
No Exit for Art: European Drama, 1950 to the Present

6 – 7:30 pm

Through a combination of lecture and discussion we will examine the rich period of European theatre from the mid-twentieth century to the present.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012
Richard M. Daley’s Chicago

6 – 7:30 pm

During his 22 years in office Richard M. Daley physically transformed Chicago. Out went the gritty, worn-down, and post-industrial Midwestern capital. In came a beautiful, sophisticated, and global city. Both business and culture thrived during his tenure.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012
The World of Chamber Music

2 – 4 pm

Chamber music often is perceived as stuffy, high-brow, and distinct from symphonic music. In fact, most compositions for small ensemble (trios, quartets, quintets, etc.) are easily accessible for the average concertgoer. The chamber music genre is a microcosm of symphonic style and form with the added attribute of intimacy.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012
Encounters with Social Theory

6 – 7:30 pm

We will explore social theory by considering the work of a number of classic sociologists, including Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Georg Simmel. In particular we will examine how their work overlapped with anthropology and psychology, and will explore their works’ relationship to the humanities.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012
Freed Slaves; Conscripted Soldiers: The Civil War Decisions of 1862-63

5:45 – 7:45 pm

The war that ended involuntary servitude in the United States also introduced military conscription. Participants in this seminar, the second in a series marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, will discuss how emancipation, conscription, and African-American military service transformed the cause of the Union and the course of the war.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012
George Eliot’s Middlemarch

6 – 7:30 pm

Middlemarch addresses the most fundamental human questions: what do we need in a relationship? Is great ambition unfulfilled worth more than modest goals achieved? How much of life do we control and how much is a product of chance?

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
Julio Cortázar’s 62: A Model Kit

6 – 7:30 pm

We will read Julio Cortázar’s celebrated novel 62: A Model Kit with the aid of his short stories. Each class session will begin with a different story that will guide our discussion toward a unique set of questions as we explore Cortázar’s longer work.

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
Reading Ulysses

6 – 7:30 pm

How does one approach James Joyce’s Ulysses? Reading this masterpiece is both like and unlike reading other novels. Through close reading and discussion of the text we will explore its major themes and concepts, navigate its calm and turbulent sections, and enjoy our travel through the landscape of this amazing book. Participants will emerge from the seminar stronger readers.

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
American Writers in Paris

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Gertrude Stein once said, “It is not what France gave you but what it did not take away from you that was important.” We will read and discuss fictional and autobiographical writings of American writers in Paris.

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
The Newberry Library Colloquium

4 - 5 pm

The Devil is in the Details: History and the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893 

Diane Dillon, Director of Scholarly and Undergraduate Programs

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
From Russia with Love: Russian Music from the Reign of Catherine the Great to Dmitri Shostakovich

2 – 4 pm

“From Russia with Love” charts the breathtaking ascent of classical music in Russia. Beginning with the reign of Catherine the Great and continuing onward to Glinka, Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, and Shostakovich, we will explore the incredible rise and the fall of Russian classical music from 1762 to 1975.

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
Renaissance Art: Theory, Practice, and Myth

6 – 7:30 pm

We will focus on the complex relationships among the realities of art making in Renaissance Italy, the theories advanced by critics and artists, and the mythologizing of artists and their creative processes.

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
Problems of Justice in a Democratic Society

6 – 7:30 pm

The values of liberty and equality are deeply rooted in American political culture and our tradition of political thought. Yet these values seem inevitably to conflict; we can have one only by limiting or regulating the other. We will consider whether this conflict can be resolved, and attempt to develop a philosophical understanding of freedom and equality.

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
Great Writers, Big Questions: Important American Essays of the Twentieth Century

6 – 7:30 pm

We will explore personal and political dimensions of “the American century” as described by some of the nation’s best writers: James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Joyce Carol Oates, Alice Walker, Tom Wolfe, and many more.

Thursday, March 8, 2012
The Great American Novels of Willa Cather

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Willa Cather moved to Nebraska at age 9, hated it, and only grew to value the West once she relocated to a big city and began to write. We will survey her great novels, from My Ántonia to Death Comes for the Archbishop. Cather’s vision of the frontier is revelatory: polyglot, musical, shimmering with culture.

Thursday, March 8, 2012
Transforming Autobiography into Fiction

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Memoir and fiction writers draw on the same sources for inspiration: experience, observation, and point of view. They use their skills to express private visions in a universal art form. Through a series of writing exercises, participants will re-create their experiences, re-examine their points of view, and use fiction techniques to expand their discoveries into finished work.

Thursday, March 8, 2012
Fundamentals of Music

2 – 3:30 pm

Clefs, time signature, key signature, major and minor scales, chords, rhythms, intervals, accidentals, and enharmonic tones: we will examine these and many other foundational music concepts to help participants develop their musical knowledge and increase their listening pleasure.

Thursday, March 8, 2012
The Latin Roots of the Romance Language Family Tree

5:45 – 7:45 pm

This course in beginning Latin offers something not usually found in introductory level classes—a brief sketch of both the ancient roots and the modern branches of a linguistic family tree.

Thursday, March 8, 2012
Music of America’s Wars

2 – 4 pm

It is ironic that war has inspired so much beautiful music. Marches, patriotic songs, sentimental ballads, concert works, victory pieces, laments, protest songs, and Broadway musicals have emerged from wartime. This seminar focuses on American music written during the Revolution, Civil War, World War I, World War II, and the Vietnam War.

Thursday, March 8, 2012
Western Mysticism: St. John of the Cross

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Western mysticism begins in antiquity and extends into modern times, reaching in John of the Cross perhaps its clearest, most radiant moment. As Jacques Maritain wrote, in John “everything takes on that straining of earth toward heaven, like the figures in a painting by El Greco.” We will read three of his greatest works—The Ascent of Mt.

Thursday, March 8, 2012
Changing Gender Roles in the United States

6 – 7:30 pm

We will delve into the history of women in twentieth-century America, with a backwards glance to the Victorian Era. We will study the history of women’s roles in the public and private spheres, as well as essential issues in women’s history, including the history of feminism, birth control, suffrage, civil rights, and sexual violence.

Friday, March 9, 2012
Seminar in Art History
Seminar in Art History, Early Modern European Maps as Art : An Icon for Peter the Great: Linking Imperial Cartography and Sacred Topography

2 pm

Saturday, March 10, 2012
Writing the Unexpected: Poetry Workshop

1 – 3 pm

The Newberry Library’s resources will be a source for inspiration, information, conversation, and playfulness in this generative workshop. We will use visual art, historical texts, and ephemera to listen, experiment with form, and create new work. Along the way we will attend to the craft of poetry, learning tricks and tips from published pieces.

Saturday, March 10, 2012
More Elements of Creative Writing

1 – 3 pm

Characters, plot, imagery, suspense, and conflict are just some of the elements of creative writing. This supportive yet challenging workshop, a continuation of the popular Elements of Creative Writing seminar, is open to writers at all levels, whether or not they have taken the previous course.

Saturday, March 10, 2012
Extraterrestrials in Western Thought from Copernicus to H. G. Wells

1 – 3 pm

Opinion about the existence of intelligent extraterrestrial life has a long history in Western thought. Since at least the fifth century BCE, the debate has engaged a surprising number of philosophers, theologians, literary figures, and scientists.

Saturday, March 10, 2012
Fundamentals of Genealogy: Basics for Everyone

Whether you’re a beginner or simply looking for formal fundamentals training, try these seminars, tailored to meet your research needs. Take all six or just those that interest you most.

Monday, March 12, 2012 to Friday, June 8, 2012
Exploration 2012: The 26th Annual Juried Exhibition of the Chicago Calligraphy Collective

The Chicago Calligraphy Collective was founded in 1976 to promote the study, practice, and appreciation of calligraphy in all its historical and present-day applications.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012
Shakespeare’s Histories

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Shakespeare’s histories deal with fascinating problems: the nature of kingship, violent personal and political conflict, the use and misuse of power. While raising these profound issues, Shakespeare enriches the plays with a gallery of memorable characters, among them Richard II, Richard III, Henry IV, Prince Hal, Hotspur, and the unforgettable Sir John Falstaff.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012
No Exit for Art: European Drama, 1950 to the Present

6 – 7:30 pm

Through a combination of lecture and discussion we will examine the rich period of European theatre from the mid-twentieth century to the present.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012
Richard M. Daley’s Chicago

6 – 7:30 pm

During his 22 years in office Richard M. Daley physically transformed Chicago. Out went the gritty, worn-down, and post-industrial Midwestern capital. In came a beautiful, sophisticated, and global city. Both business and culture thrived during his tenure.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012
The World of Chamber Music

2 – 4 pm

Chamber music often is perceived as stuffy, high-brow, and distinct from symphonic music. In fact, most compositions for small ensemble (trios, quartets, quintets, etc.) are easily accessible for the average concertgoer. The chamber music genre is a microcosm of symphonic style and form with the added attribute of intimacy.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012
Encounters with Social Theory

6 – 7:30 pm

We will explore social theory by considering the work of a number of classic sociologists, including Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Georg Simmel. In particular we will examine how their work overlapped with anthropology and psychology, and will explore their works’ relationship to the humanities.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012
The Age of Napoleon

5:45 – 7:45 pm

In exploring the life of Napoleon and the history of France during his times, this course will consider the legacy of the legendary ruler.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012
Freed Slaves; Conscripted Soldiers: The Civil War Decisions of 1862-63

5:45 – 7:45 pm

The war that ended involuntary servitude in the United States also introduced military conscription. Participants in this seminar, the second in a series marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, will discuss how emancipation, conscription, and African-American military service transformed the cause of the Union and the course of the war.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012
George Eliot’s Middlemarch

6 – 7:30 pm

Middlemarch addresses the most fundamental human questions: what do we need in a relationship? Is great ambition unfulfilled worth more than modest goals achieved? How much of life do we control and how much is a product of chance?

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
Julio Cortázar’s 62: A Model Kit

6 – 7:30 pm

We will read Julio Cortázar’s celebrated novel 62: A Model Kit with the aid of his short stories. Each class session will begin with a different story that will guide our discussion toward a unique set of questions as we explore Cortázar’s longer work.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
Reading Ulysses

6 – 7:30 pm

How does one approach James Joyce’s Ulysses? Reading this masterpiece is both like and unlike reading other novels. Through close reading and discussion of the text we will explore its major themes and concepts, navigate its calm and turbulent sections, and enjoy our travel through the landscape of this amazing book. Participants will emerge from the seminar stronger readers.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
American Writers in Paris

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Gertrude Stein once said, “It is not what France gave you but what it did not take away from you that was important.” We will read and discuss fictional and autobiographical writings of American writers in Paris.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
The Mind at Work: Writing the Personal Essay

5:45 – 7:45 pm

The personal essay thrives today because of its versatility of both subject and form. It can be funny, serious, scolding, or meditative. It can take the shape of a memoir or character sketch; book review or commentary; blog post or travel essay. In this writing workshop, we will practice writing the personal essay, then present drafts of our work for helpful feedback.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
American Indian Studies Seminar Series
Joseph Genetin-Pilawa and Agathe Cabau

5:30 - 7:30 pm

This seminar is co-sponsored by the Center for American History and Culture

The Federal City and Indigenous Space: Imaging and Imagining Colonialism in Nineteenth-Century Washington DC
Joe Genetin-Pilawa, Illinois College
This seminar is co-sponsored by the Center for American History and Culture

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
The Newberry Library Colloquium

4 - 5 pm

Compact Shelving Project

John Brady, Director of Reader Services and Bibliographer of Americana

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
From Russia with Love: Russian Music from the Reign of Catherine the Great to Dmitri Shostakovich

2 – 4 pm

“From Russia with Love” charts the breathtaking ascent of classical music in Russia. Beginning with the reign of Catherine the Great and continuing onward to Glinka, Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, and Shostakovich, we will explore the incredible rise and the fall of Russian classical music from 1762 to 1975.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
Renaissance Art: Theory, Practice, and Myth

6 – 7:30 pm

We will focus on the complex relationships among the realities of art making in Renaissance Italy, the theories advanced by critics and artists, and the mythologizing of artists and their creative processes.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
Problems of Justice in a Democratic Society

6 – 7:30 pm

The values of liberty and equality are deeply rooted in American political culture and our tradition of political thought. Yet these values seem inevitably to conflict; we can have one only by limiting or regulating the other. We will consider whether this conflict can be resolved, and attempt to develop a philosophical understanding of freedom and equality.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
Great Writers, Big Questions: Important American Essays of the Twentieth Century

6 – 7:30 pm

We will explore personal and political dimensions of “the American century” as described by some of the nation’s best writers: James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Joyce Carol Oates, Alice Walker, Tom Wolfe, and many more.

Thursday, March 15, 2012
The Great American Novels of Willa Cather

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Willa Cather moved to Nebraska at age 9, hated it, and only grew to value the West once she relocated to a big city and began to write. We will survey her great novels, from My Ántonia to Death Comes for the Archbishop. Cather’s vision of the frontier is revelatory: polyglot, musical, shimmering with culture.

Thursday, March 15, 2012
Fundamentals of Music

2 – 3:30 pm

Clefs, time signature, key signature, major and minor scales, chords, rhythms, intervals, accidentals, and enharmonic tones: we will examine these and many other foundational music concepts to help participants develop their musical knowledge and increase their listening pleasure.

Thursday, March 15, 2012
The Latin Roots of the Romance Language Family Tree

5:45 – 7:45 pm

This course in beginning Latin offers something not usually found in introductory level classes—a brief sketch of both the ancient roots and the modern branches of a linguistic family tree.

Thursday, March 15, 2012
Music of America’s Wars

2 – 4 pm

It is ironic that war has inspired so much beautiful music. Marches, patriotic songs, sentimental ballads, concert works, victory pieces, laments, protest songs, and Broadway musicals have emerged from wartime. This seminar focuses on American music written during the Revolution, Civil War, World War I, World War II, and the Vietnam War.

Thursday, March 15, 2012
Western Mysticism: St. John of the Cross

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Western mysticism begins in antiquity and extends into modern times, reaching in John of the Cross perhaps its clearest, most radiant moment. As Jacques Maritain wrote, in John “everything takes on that straining of earth toward heaven, like the figures in a painting by El Greco.” We will read three of his greatest works—The Ascent of Mt.

Thursday, March 15, 2012
Changing Gender Roles in the United States

6 – 7:30 pm

We will delve into the history of women in twentieth-century America, with a backwards glance to the Victorian Era. We will study the history of women’s roles in the public and private spheres, as well as essential issues in women’s history, including the history of feminism, birth control, suffrage, civil rights, and sexual violence.

Saturday, March 17, 2012
Childhood in Russia: Leo Tolstoy, Maxim Gorky, and Vladimir Nabokov

10 am – Noon

Why does Tolstoy’s presentation of childhood have such a profound hold on the Russian imagination? How did it become the point of departure for other writers?

Saturday, March 17, 2012
More Elements of Creative Writing

1 – 3 pm

Characters, plot, imagery, suspense, and conflict are just some of the elements of creative writing. This supportive yet challenging workshop, a continuation of the popular Elements of Creative Writing seminar, is open to writers at all levels, whether or not they have taken the previous course.

Saturday, March 17, 2012
Public Symposium: Border Troubles and Indian-Anglo Conflict in the War of 1812

10:00 am program; 9:30 am coffee and light refreshments

This symposium is made possible in part by generous support from the Consulate General of Canada, Chicago.
There will be a discussion with the audience following the talks.

Earthshaking History: Tecumseh, the Red Stick Creeks, and the South

Speaker: Gregory Dowd, History and American Culture, University of Michigan

Saturday, March 17, 2012
Jane Austen’s World: Society, Politics, and Culture in Regency England

10 am – Noon

To enhance enjoyment of Jane Austen’s novels, this course will survey English society in the late Georgian period.

Saturday, March 17, 2012
Extraterrestrials in Western Thought from Copernicus to H. G. Wells

1 – 3 pm

Opinion about the existence of intelligent extraterrestrial life has a long history in Western thought. Since at least the fifth century BCE, the debate has engaged a surprising number of philosophers, theologians, literary figures, and scientists.

Saturday, March 17, 2012
Fundamentals of Genealogy: Basics for Everyone

Whether you’re a beginner or simply looking for formal fundamentals training, try these seminars, tailored to meet your research needs. Take all six or just those that interest you most.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
Shakespeare’s Histories

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Shakespeare’s histories deal with fascinating problems: the nature of kingship, violent personal and political conflict, the use and misuse of power. While raising these profound issues, Shakespeare enriches the plays with a gallery of memorable characters, among them Richard II, Richard III, Henry IV, Prince Hal, Hotspur, and the unforgettable Sir John Falstaff.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
No Exit for Art: European Drama, 1950 to the Present

6 – 7:30 pm

Through a combination of lecture and discussion we will examine the rich period of European theatre from the mid-twentieth century to the present.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
Richard M. Daley’s Chicago

6 – 7:30 pm

During his 22 years in office Richard M. Daley physically transformed Chicago. Out went the gritty, worn-down, and post-industrial Midwestern capital. In came a beautiful, sophisticated, and global city. Both business and culture thrived during his tenure.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
The World of Chamber Music

2 – 4 pm

Chamber music often is perceived as stuffy, high-brow, and distinct from symphonic music. In fact, most compositions for small ensemble (trios, quartets, quintets, etc.) are easily accessible for the average concertgoer. The chamber music genre is a microcosm of symphonic style and form with the added attribute of intimacy.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
Encounters with Social Theory

6 – 7:30 pm

We will explore social theory by considering the work of a number of classic sociologists, including Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Georg Simmel. In particular we will examine how their work overlapped with anthropology and psychology, and will explore their works’ relationship to the humanities.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
The Age of Napoleon

5:45 – 7:45 pm

In exploring the life of Napoleon and the history of France during his times, this course will consider the legacy of the legendary ruler.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
Freed Slaves; Conscripted Soldiers: The Civil War Decisions of 1862-63

5:45 – 7:45 pm

The war that ended involuntary servitude in the United States also introduced military conscription. Participants in this seminar, the second in a series marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, will discuss how emancipation, conscription, and African-American military service transformed the cause of the Union and the course of the war.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012
George Eliot’s Middlemarch

6 – 7:30 pm

Middlemarch addresses the most fundamental human questions: what do we need in a relationship? Is great ambition unfulfilled worth more than modest goals achieved? How much of life do we control and how much is a product of chance?

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
Julio Cortázar’s 62: A Model Kit

6 – 7:30 pm

We will read Julio Cortázar’s celebrated novel 62: A Model Kit with the aid of his short stories. Each class session will begin with a different story that will guide our discussion toward a unique set of questions as we explore Cortázar’s longer work.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
Reading Ulysses

6 – 7:30 pm

How does one approach James Joyce’s Ulysses? Reading this masterpiece is both like and unlike reading other novels. Through close reading and discussion of the text we will explore its major themes and concepts, navigate its calm and turbulent sections, and enjoy our travel through the landscape of this amazing book. Participants will emerge from the seminar stronger readers.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
American Writers in Paris

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Gertrude Stein once said, “It is not what France gave you but what it did not take away from you that was important.” We will read and discuss fictional and autobiographical writings of American writers in Paris.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
The Mind at Work: Writing the Personal Essay

5:45 – 7:45 pm

The personal essay thrives today because of its versatility of both subject and form. It can be funny, serious, scolding, or meditative. It can take the shape of a memoir or character sketch; book review or commentary; blog post or travel essay. In this writing workshop, we will practice writing the personal essay, then present drafts of our work for helpful feedback.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
The Newberry Library Colloquium

4 - 5 pm

“Modern in the Nth Degree”: American Domestic Interiors at the World’s Fairs 

Liz McGoey, Ph.D. Candidate in Art History, Indiana University and Newberry Graduate Scholar-in-Residence

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
From Russia with Love: Russian Music from the Reign of Catherine the Great to Dmitri Shostakovich

2 – 4 pm

“From Russia with Love” charts the breathtaking ascent of classical music in Russia. Beginning with the reign of Catherine the Great and continuing onward to Glinka, Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, and Shostakovich, we will explore the incredible rise and the fall of Russian classical music from 1762 to 1975.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
Renaissance Art: Theory, Practice, and Myth

6 – 7:30 pm

We will focus on the complex relationships among the realities of art making in Renaissance Italy, the theories advanced by critics and artists, and the mythologizing of artists and their creative processes.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
Problems of Justice in a Democratic Society

6 – 7:30 pm

The values of liberty and equality are deeply rooted in American political culture and our tradition of political thought. Yet these values seem inevitably to conflict; we can have one only by limiting or regulating the other. We will consider whether this conflict can be resolved, and attempt to develop a philosophical understanding of freedom and equality.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012
Great Writers, Big Questions: Important American Essays of the Twentieth Century

6 – 7:30 pm

We will explore personal and political dimensions of “the American century” as described by some of the nation’s best writers: James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Joyce Carol Oates, Alice Walker, Tom Wolfe, and many more.

Thursday, March 22, 2012
The Great American Novels of Willa Cather

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Willa Cather moved to Nebraska at age 9, hated it, and only grew to value the West once she relocated to a big city and began to write. We will survey her great novels, from My Ántonia to Death Comes for the Archbishop. Cather’s vision of the frontier is revelatory: polyglot, musical, shimmering with culture.

Thursday, March 22, 2012
Fundamentals of Music

2 – 3:30 pm

Clefs, time signature, key signature, major and minor scales, chords, rhythms, intervals, accidentals, and enharmonic tones: we will examine these and many other foundational music concepts to help participants develop their musical knowledge and increase their listening pleasure.

Thursday, March 22, 2012
The Latin Roots of the Romance Language Family Tree

5:45 – 7:45 pm

This course in beginning Latin offers something not usually found in introductory level classes—a brief sketch of both the ancient roots and the modern branches of a linguistic family tree.

Thursday, March 22, 2012
Music of America’s Wars

2 – 4 pm

It is ironic that war has inspired so much beautiful music. Marches, patriotic songs, sentimental ballads, concert works, victory pieces, laments, protest songs, and Broadway musicals have emerged from wartime. This seminar focuses on American music written during the Revolution, Civil War, World War I, World War II, and the Vietnam War.

Thursday, March 22, 2012
Western Mysticism: St. John of the Cross

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Western mysticism begins in antiquity and extends into modern times, reaching in John of the Cross perhaps its clearest, most radiant moment. As Jacques Maritain wrote, in John “everything takes on that straining of earth toward heaven, like the figures in a painting by El Greco.” We will read three of his greatest works—The Ascent of Mt.

Thursday, March 22, 2012
Changing Gender Roles in the United States

6 – 7:30 pm

We will delve into the history of women in twentieth-century America, with a backwards glance to the Victorian Era. We will study the history of women’s roles in the public and private spheres, as well as essential issues in women’s history, including the history of feminism, birth control, suffrage, civil rights, and sexual violence.

Saturday, March 24, 2012
French Literature Between Two Wars

10 am – Noon

The trauma of the First World War, combined with the influence of Freudian ideas and other cultural upheavals, dramatically shaped French writers, as well as other European literary voices.

Saturday, March 24, 2012
Childhood in Russia: Leo Tolstoy, Maxim Gorky, and Vladimir Nabokov

10 am – Noon

Why does Tolstoy’s presentation of childhood have such a profound hold on the Russian imagination? How did it become the point of departure for other writers?

Saturday, March 24, 2012
More Elements of Creative Writing

1 – 3 pm

Characters, plot, imagery, suspense, and conflict are just some of the elements of creative writing. This supportive yet challenging workshop, a continuation of the popular Elements of Creative Writing seminar, is open to writers at all levels, whether or not they have taken the previous course.

Saturday, March 24, 2012
Oh, The Possibilities: Writing for Children in Today’s Publishing World

10 am – 4 pm

Eager to write and publish that children’s book you’ve dreamed about? This workshop introduces newcomers to today’s world of children’s book publishing—the markets, the genres, the formats, and the audience niches—and recommends a few rules of the road and tried-and-true shortcuts that make navigation easier.

Saturday, March 24, 2012
Chicago Area Women's History Council: A New Oral History Project

10:00 am (Registration will open at 9:30 am)

Join the Chicago Area Women’s History Council as they kick off the oral history component of their project “Documenting Women’s Activism and Leadership in the Chicago Area, 1945 - 2000.” Learn details of the project and how you can participate.

Saturday, March 24, 2012
Jane Austen’s World: Society, Politics, and Culture in Regency England

10 am – Noon

To enhance enjoyment of Jane Austen’s novels, this course will survey English society in the late Georgian period.

Saturday, March 24, 2012
Extraterrestrials in Western Thought from Copernicus to H. G. Wells

1 – 3 pm

Opinion about the existence of intelligent extraterrestrial life has a long history in Western thought. Since at least the fifth century BCE, the debate has engaged a surprising number of philosophers, theologians, literary figures, and scientists.

Saturday, March 24, 2012
Fundamentals of Genealogy: Basics for Everyone

Whether you’re a beginner or simply looking for formal fundamentals training, try these seminars, tailored to meet your research needs. Take all six or just those that interest you most.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012
Shakespeare’s Histories

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Shakespeare’s histories deal with fascinating problems: the nature of kingship, violent personal and political conflict, the use and misuse of power. While raising these profound issues, Shakespeare enriches the plays with a gallery of memorable characters, among them Richard II, Richard III, Henry IV, Prince Hal, Hotspur, and the unforgettable Sir John Falstaff.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012
No Exit for Art: European Drama, 1950 to the Present

6 – 7:30 pm

Through a combination of lecture and discussion we will examine the rich period of European theatre from the mid-twentieth century to the present.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012
Richard M. Daley’s Chicago

6 – 7:30 pm

During his 22 years in office Richard M. Daley physically transformed Chicago. Out went the gritty, worn-down, and post-industrial Midwestern capital. In came a beautiful, sophisticated, and global city. Both business and culture thrived during his tenure.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012
The World of Chamber Music

2 – 4 pm

Chamber music often is perceived as stuffy, high-brow, and distinct from symphonic music. In fact, most compositions for small ensemble (trios, quartets, quintets, etc.) are easily accessible for the average concertgoer. The chamber music genre is a microcosm of symphonic style and form with the added attribute of intimacy.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012
Encounters with Social Theory

6 – 7:30 pm

We will explore social theory by considering the work of a number of classic sociologists, including Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Georg Simmel. In particular we will examine how their work overlapped with anthropology and psychology, and will explore their works’ relationship to the humanities.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012
The Age of Napoleon

5:45 – 7:45 pm

In exploring the life of Napoleon and the history of France during his times, this course will consider the legacy of the legendary ruler.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012
Freed Slaves; Conscripted Soldiers: The Civil War Decisions of 1862-63

5:45 – 7:45 pm

The war that ended involuntary servitude in the United States also introduced military conscription. Participants in this seminar, the second in a series marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War, will discuss how emancipation, conscription, and African-American military service transformed the cause of the Union and the course of the war.

Tuesday, March 27, 2012
George Eliot’s Middlemarch

6 – 7:30 pm

Middlemarch addresses the most fundamental human questions: what do we need in a relationship? Is great ambition unfulfilled worth more than modest goals achieved? How much of life do we control and how much is a product of chance?

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
Julio Cortázar’s 62: A Model Kit

6 – 7:30 pm

We will read Julio Cortázar’s celebrated novel 62: A Model Kit with the aid of his short stories. Each class session will begin with a different story that will guide our discussion toward a unique set of questions as we explore Cortázar’s longer work.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
Reading Ulysses

6 – 7:30 pm

How does one approach James Joyce’s Ulysses? Reading this masterpiece is both like and unlike reading other novels. Through close reading and discussion of the text we will explore its major themes and concepts, navigate its calm and turbulent sections, and enjoy our travel through the landscape of this amazing book. Participants will emerge from the seminar stronger readers.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
American Writers in Paris

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Gertrude Stein once said, “It is not what France gave you but what it did not take away from you that was important.” We will read and discuss fictional and autobiographical writings of American writers in Paris.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
The Mind at Work: Writing the Personal Essay

5:45 – 7:45 pm

The personal essay thrives today because of its versatility of both subject and form. It can be funny, serious, scolding, or meditative. It can take the shape of a memoir or character sketch; book review or commentary; blog post or travel essay. In this writing workshop, we will practice writing the personal essay, then present drafts of our work for helpful feedback.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
History of the Book Lecture
History of the Book Lecture: Julia Walworth : Becoming a Knight: Visual Evidence in Medieval Books

5:30 pm

Julia Walworth, Merton College, University of Oxford

The medieval knight is not usually associated with book culture, yet contemporary manuscripts contain imagery that offers fruitful insights into the secular and ecclesiastical dimensions of chivalric ritual.

A reception will follow the lecture.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
The Newberry Library Colloquium

4 - 5 pm

“The Architect and his Acrobats”: Highlights from the Newberry’s Circus Collection 

Jo Ellen McKillop Dickie, Special Collections Services Librarian

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
From Russia with Love: Russian Music from the Reign of Catherine the Great to Dmitri Shostakovich

2 – 4 pm

“From Russia with Love” charts the breathtaking ascent of classical music in Russia. Beginning with the reign of Catherine the Great and continuing onward to Glinka, Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, and Shostakovich, we will explore the incredible rise and the fall of Russian classical music from 1762 to 1975.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
Renaissance Art: Theory, Practice, and Myth

6 – 7:30 pm

We will focus on the complex relationships among the realities of art making in Renaissance Italy, the theories advanced by critics and artists, and the mythologizing of artists and their creative processes.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
Problems of Justice in a Democratic Society

6 – 7:30 pm

The values of liberty and equality are deeply rooted in American political culture and our tradition of political thought. Yet these values seem inevitably to conflict; we can have one only by limiting or regulating the other. We will consider whether this conflict can be resolved, and attempt to develop a philosophical understanding of freedom and equality.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
Great Writers, Big Questions: Important American Essays of the Twentieth Century

6 – 7:30 pm

We will explore personal and political dimensions of “the American century” as described by some of the nation’s best writers: James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Joyce Carol Oates, Alice Walker, Tom Wolfe, and many more.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
Staged Reading: The Bird Feeder Doesn't Know by Todd Bauer

6 pm

What happens at the end of a lifetime of love?

“It’s there.  Like an old building.  Once it settles it gets stronger.  And before you know it, it’s ugly, but nobody wants to tear it down.  Can’t imagine the block without it.  Your mother takes good care of me.  Always has.
(Beat)
But eventually, even old buildings get torn down.”

Thursday, March 29, 2012
The Great American Novels of Willa Cather

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Willa Cather moved to Nebraska at age 9, hated it, and only grew to value the West once she relocated to a big city and began to write. We will survey her great novels, from My Ántonia to Death Comes for the Archbishop. Cather’s vision of the frontier is revelatory: polyglot, musical, shimmering with culture.

Thursday, March 29, 2012
Fundamentals of Music

2 – 3:30 pm

Clefs, time signature, key signature, major and minor scales, chords, rhythms, intervals, accidentals, and enharmonic tones: we will examine these and many other foundational music concepts to help participants develop their musical knowledge and increase their listening pleasure.

Thursday, March 29, 2012
The Latin Roots of the Romance Language Family Tree

5:45 – 7:45 pm

This course in beginning Latin offers something not usually found in introductory level classes—a brief sketch of both the ancient roots and the modern branches of a linguistic family tree.

Thursday, March 29, 2012
Music of America’s Wars

2 – 4 pm

It is ironic that war has inspired so much beautiful music. Marches, patriotic songs, sentimental ballads, concert works, victory pieces, laments, protest songs, and Broadway musicals have emerged from wartime. This seminar focuses on American music written during the Revolution, Civil War, World War I, World War II, and the Vietnam War.

Thursday, March 29, 2012
Western Mysticism: St. John of the Cross

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Western mysticism begins in antiquity and extends into modern times, reaching in John of the Cross perhaps its clearest, most radiant moment. As Jacques Maritain wrote, in John “everything takes on that straining of earth toward heaven, like the figures in a painting by El Greco.” We will read three of his greatest works—The Ascent of Mt.

Thursday, March 29, 2012
Changing Gender Roles in the United States

6 – 7:30 pm

We will delve into the history of women in twentieth-century America, with a backwards glance to the Victorian Era. We will study the history of women’s roles in the public and private spheres, as well as essential issues in women’s history, including the history of feminism, birth control, suffrage, civil rights, and sexual violence.

Friday, March 30, 2012 to Saturday, July 7, 2012
Collecting America : How a Friendship Enriched Our Understanding of American Culture

When Chicago steel magnate Everett D. Graff walked into Wright Howes’ bookshop on Michigan Avenue in the 1920s he sparked one of the most important friendships in the book world. Their four-decade partnership, which included cross-country road trips in search of books, manuscripts, and maps, resulted in a world-class American history collection, which Graff donated to the Newberry in 1964.

Saturday, March 31, 2012
Writing the Unexpected: Poetry Workshop

1 – 3 pm

The Newberry Library’s resources will be a source for inspiration, information, conversation, and playfulness in this generative workshop. We will use visual art, historical texts, and ephemera to listen, experiment with form, and create new work. Along the way we will attend to the craft of poetry, learning tricks and tips from published pieces.

Saturday, March 31, 2012
French Literature Between Two Wars

10 am – Noon

The trauma of the First World War, combined with the influence of Freudian ideas and other cultural upheavals, dramatically shaped French writers, as well as other European literary voices.

Saturday, March 31, 2012
Childhood in Russia: Leo Tolstoy, Maxim Gorky, and Vladimir Nabokov

10 am – Noon

Why does Tolstoy’s presentation of childhood have such a profound hold on the Russian imagination? How did it become the point of departure for other writers?

Saturday, March 31, 2012
More Elements of Creative Writing

1 – 3 pm

Characters, plot, imagery, suspense, and conflict are just some of the elements of creative writing. This supportive yet challenging workshop, a continuation of the popular Elements of Creative Writing seminar, is open to writers at all levels, whether or not they have taken the previous course.

Saturday, March 31, 2012
Exploring Chicago’s Parks

10 am – Noon

We will explore the origins and development of several Chicago parks through a series of walking tours. We will study their evolving landscape designs, goals, and patterns of use, along with their architecture and sculpture.

Saturday, March 31, 2012
Jane Austen’s World: Society, Politics, and Culture in Regency England

10 am – Noon

To enhance enjoyment of Jane Austen’s novels, this course will survey English society in the late Georgian period.

Saturday, March 31, 2012
Extraterrestrials in Western Thought from Copernicus to H. G. Wells

1 – 3 pm

Opinion about the existence of intelligent extraterrestrial life has a long history in Western thought. Since at least the fifth century BCE, the debate has engaged a surprising number of philosophers, theologians, literary figures, and scientists.

Saturday, March 31, 2012
Genealogy, DNA Testing, & Medical Family Trees

1 – 4 pm

Today’s DNA test results can reveal a great deal of information about kinship and medical predispositions. This course will help you understand testing options, choose the best testing companies, review resources for analyzing and posting the test results, and learn how to incorporate the information into your kinship and medical family histories.