March 2014

Friday, September 27, 2013 to Monday, March 24, 2014
Home Front: Daily Life in the Civil War North

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the US Civil War and in conjunction with the Terra Foundation for American Art, the Newberry Library have mounted “Home Front: Daily Life in the Civil War North,” an exhibition of more than 100 items that focuses on the enormous, and costly, effect the war had on civilians.

Saturday, March 1, 2014
Genealogy and Local History Orientation

9:30 am

The Genealogy and Local History staff will introduce novices to the basics of research at an informal orientation. After the session, you are welcome to begin your research. A reference librarian will be available to provide suggestions and assistance. Reservations not required.

Tuesday, March 4, 2014
Staged Reading: T.S. Eliot's Four Quartets

6 pm

T. S. Eliot is widely regarded as one of the finest poets of the English language. Four Quartets, Eliot’s last major poetic work, is a stunning achievement written at the height of his powers.

Wednesday, March 5, 2014
The Newberry Library Colloquium : Re-Writing the Declaration of Sentiments: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Present-Day Gender Policy

4 pm

In July 1848, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and several contemporaries publicly presented the founding document of the women’s rights movement in the United States, the Declaration of Sentiments, in Seneca Falls, New York.

Wednesday, March 12, 2014
Stormy, Husky, and Brawling: 100 Years of Carl Sandburg's Chicago

5 to 7 pm

In March, 1914, Poetry magazine published Carl Sandburg’s controversial Chicago Poems, including the title ode to Chicago in which he famously coins it “City of the Big Shoulders.”To mark the occasion, from 5 to 7 p.m.

Wednesday, March 12, 2014
The Newberry Library Colloquium : Reading the Pope's Mail: Rome and Papal Diplomats in Counter-Reformation Europe

4 pm

In the face of the Reformation, communication with the far reaches of Europe became vital for popes during the sixteenth century.

Thursday, March 13, 2014
Researching Your Irish Ancestors

4 pm

Fintan Mullan and Gillian Hunt from the Ulster Historical Foundation will give four talks about researching family histories in Ireland. Come and explore new techniques and approaches for your personal family research. The talks will be:

Thursday, March 13, 2014
"Home Front" Curator-led Exhibition Tour

6 pm

Join us for this free tour of “Home Front: Daily Life in the Civil War North,” Chicago’s only major exhibition on the Civil War during its 150th anniversary. One of the exhibition’s co-curators will walk visitors through more than 100 items that focus on the enormous, and costly, effect the war had on civilians.

Wednesday, March 19, 2014
The Newberry Library Colloquium : Finding Mahler: The Composer as His Contemporaries Viewed Him

4 pm

A century ago Mahler was an international star conductor who was controversial as a composer. Yet when he died the controversies about his music metamorphosed into praise about his important contributions to classical music.

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
American Indian Studies Seminar Series
Cherokee-British Alliance in the Tennessee Corridor, 1670-1758

5:30 pm to 6:30 pm

This essay explores the complexities of Cherokee-British interaction along the Tennessee River. Between 1670 and 1758 Europeans became aware of a “corridor” that could connect British Carolina with the Ohio Valley, the Wabash River, and the Illinois country via the Tennessee.

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
The Newberry Library Colloquium : City in a Garden: Uncovering the History of Urban Agriculture in Chicago

4 pm

Though nineteenth-century Chicago is often remembered for its stockyards and grain elevators, these industrial food systems represented just some of the many ways that the city’s residents put food on the table. A diverse group of Chicagoans also practiced urban agriculture, using backyards and side streets to raise pigs, chickens, fruits, and vegetables.

Saturday, March 29, 2014
Congress on the Declaration of Rights and Sentiments

9 am to 12 pm

On July 19th and 20th, 1848, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and several of her contemporaries publicly presented the founding document of the women’s rights movement in the United States, the Declaration of Sentiments, in Seneca Falls, New York, and then gathered resolutions to be included in the document before printing.