Calendar

E.g., 09/17/2014
E.g., 09/17/2014
Thursday, September 18, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
No Exit for Art: European Drama, 1906-1968

6 - 7:30 pm

This class is full and registration has closed.

This lecture and discussion-based seminar will examine the rich period of European theater from the first half of the twentieth century.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
The Source Of Stories: Writing From Your Experience and Imagination

10 am – Noon

This class is full and registration has closed.

Writing begins with you. In this workshop we will learn how to organize our lives and our writing as well as reach into our own experiences and imaginations to produce stories of any length. Through a step-by-step process, we will explore where stories come from, how to begin them, and how to tell them.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Victoria and Edward VII: The British Monarchy, 1837–1910

10 am - Noon

The Victorian and Edwardian periods encompassed enormous social, political, and cultural changes.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Inanna: Sumeria's Erotic Goddess, and Solomon's Song

 1 – 3 pm

Inanna’s story may be the oldest on earth. In it, the goddess copes with a serpent-infested tree, tricks the god of wisdom, builds human civilization, delights in extravagant sexual joy, and descends to the underworld.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
George Kennan and American Diplomacy

9 am - 4 pm

The short book American Diplomacy, 1900–1950 by the late scholar-diplomat George F. Kennan, is an unusual classic: a critique of US foreign policy widely used in the training of american diplomats. Participants will discuss this text and and assess whether there is a place in the foreign policy of a democracy for Kennan’s “realist” style of dispassionate analysis.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Dostoevsky's The Gambler and The Idiot

10 am - Noon (Morning session) OR 1 - 3 pm (Afternoon session)

Afternoon class is cancelled.

We will examine Dostoevsky’s sprawling and mysterious The Idiot against his compact and fast-moving novel The Gambler and several film adaptations, including Akira Kurosawa’s The Idiot. Through interactions between characters and exploration of various systems of ethics, we will navigate the multiple levels of plot and ideas in The Idiot. Readings will be...

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Shakespeare's Wars of the Roses Power, Action and Conflict

1 - 3 pm

Shakespeare populates his Wars of the Roses plays with vividly drawn characters who use their power to take actions against opposing forces. We will focus our attention on these complex indivudals by studying, viewing, and discussing nine important characters from Shakespeare’s first tetralogy (Henry VI, Parts 1, 2, 3 and Richard III).

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
How War Changed Women: Perspectives on British Life, Fiction, and Fashion during World War I

5:45 - 7:45 pm

This class is full and registration has closed.

This seminar considers the lives of British women from the years leading up to the Great War through its aftermath (1910–1925). As women coped with wartime, they forged and expressed new identities through memoirs, novels, imagery, and dress.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Tales of the Jazz Age

6 - 7:30 pm

Although it was a short period in American culture, the Jazz Age (1919–1929) continues to attract and excite students of American literature and history. We will read literature from Lost Generation and Harlem Renaissance writers to better understand the thrall and significance of the era. In addition to critical articles and essays, we will read This Side of Paradise by F.

Thursday, September 25, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Writing the City

5:45 - 7:45 pm

This workshop will give Chicagoans the chance to capture the essence of their city in words. Using personal essays, blog posts, opinion pieces, and short memoirs, we will write about those aspects of urban living that most captivate us: the rich and varied cultural offerings; the architecture, community gardens, and green spaces; our vast network of vibrant and struggling neighborhoods.

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