Calendar

E.g., 08/27/2014
E.g., 08/27/2014
Tuesday, September 23, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Tales of the Jazz Age

6 - 7:30 pm

Although it was a short period in American culture, the Jazz Age (1919–1929) continues to attract and excite students of American literature and history. We will read literature from Lost Generation and Harlem Renaissance writers to better understand the thrall and significance of the era. In addition to critical articles and essays, we will read This Side of Paradise by F.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
How War Changed Women: Perspectives on British Life, Fiction, and Fashion during World War I

5:45 - 7:45 pm

This seminar considers the lives of British women from the years leading up to the Great War through its aftermath (1910–1925). As women coped with wartime, they forged and expressed new identities through memoirs, novels, imagery, and dress.

Thursday, September 25, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Writing the City

5:45 - 7:45 pm

This workshop will give Chicagoans the chance to capture the essence of their city in words. Using personal essays, blog posts, opinion pieces, and short memoirs, we will write about those aspects of urban living that most captivate us: the rich and varied cultural offerings; the architecture, community gardens, and green spaces; our vast network of vibrant and struggling neighborhoods.

Thursday, September 25, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
The Beat Goes On: Writing Poetry in Meter and Form

2 - 4 pm

Have you ever wanted to write iambic meter after reading Shakespeare? Has a poem in Poetry magazine surprised you by being formal and colloquial? Maybe you are already writing in meter and rhyme but want to know more about how today’s poets use forms such as iambs, trochees, and dactyls?

Thursday, September 25, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Queen of Instruments: The Violin and Its Music

2 - 4 pm

Traceable to the harp and lyre of antiquity, as well as to the medieval fiddle, the violin began to acquire its present shape and character in the seventeenth century. At first it was an ensemble instrument, but its possibilities as a solo instrument were soon recognized.

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