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John Scottowe. Letter "I" from "Calligraphic Alphabet," 1592. Wing MS ZW 545 .S431.
John Scottowe. Letter "I" from "Calligraphic Alphabet," 1592. Wing MS ZW 545 .S431.

Welcome to the blog for the Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies! We post about center programs; items in the Newberry collections of special interest to those involved in medieval, Renaissance, or early modern studies; and profiles of scholars coming to the Newberry to present talks or pursue their research in those areas of study. We welcome your comments.

Overview of 2015-16 programs

Newberry Inc. 5168
From one of the works to be discussed at next year's History of the Book Symposium. Luca Pacioli, Somma di aritmetica, geometria, proporzione e proporzionalita, 1494. Newberry Inc. 5168, f. 1r.

Before our readers go their various ways for the summer, I’d like to point out that the Center for Renaissance Studies once again has scheduled a full slate of programs for the 2015-16 academic year. Here’s an overview.

Our offerings geared toward graduate students include our ever-popular Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference (the CFP deadline will be October 15); the Dissertation Seminar for Literary Scholars (the deadline to apply has passed); two Ten-Week Graduate Seminars: Poetry, Politics, & Community in High Medieval France (fall), and Thinking with Stones in Early Modern Europe (spring); and five Research Methods Workshops for Early Career Graduate Students:

All of our graduate programs have limited enrollment by competitive application. See the links above for details and application deadlines and instructions.

We will also host three day-long symposia in our three annual series on medieval studies, early modern studies, and the history of the book, respectively: a Symposium on New Approaches to Medieval Drama; a Symposium on Cervantes and Shakespeare; and Early Modern Geometries: A History of the Book Symposium. Other regular programs include our Dante Lecture, two Eighteenth Century Seminars, and two Milton Seminars. All of these programs are free and open to the public, but require registration in advance. You’ll find a link to the online registration form on the web pages linked above.

In addition, the Shakespeare Project of Chicago will perform four staged readings. Three are by Shakespeare: Julius Caesar, The Winter’s Tale, and Cymbeline; plus Cardenio, by Charles Mee and Stephen Greenblatt. These programs are free and open to the public, no tickets or reservations required.

Finally, two Mellon Summer Institutes in Vernacular Paleography will take place during summer 2016: in French at the Newberry and in English at the Huntington Library in California. The application deadline for both will be March 1, 2016; application materials and instructions will be available in January.

We hope you’ll be able to join us for one or more of these programs.

Posted by Karen Christianson.

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