Graduate Seminars | Newberry

Graduate Seminars

Jacques LeGrand, Le livre de bonnes moeurs, before 1478. Vault Case MS 55.5

Jacques LeGrand, Le livre de bonnes moeurs, before 1478. Vault Case MS 55.5

Students may take these ten-week seminars on a not-for-credit basis or arrange to earn credit at their home campuses. When space permits, consortium faculty members are encouraged to audit Newberry seminars, and graduate students from non-consortium schools may also enroll. The course fee is waived for consortium students.

Seminars are taught by consortium scholars in their fields of specialization. Participants interact with fellow students from a variety of institutions and disciplines, while gaining a firsthand introduction to the Newberry’s holdings of manuscripts and early editions in its areas of strength.

Note: Graduate students of Center for Renaissance Studies Consortium member universities may be eligible to apply for Newberry Renaissance Consortium Grants to attend CRS programs or to do research at the Newberry. Each member university sets its own policies and deadlines; contact your Representative Council member in advance for details.

See information about proposing to teach a graduate seminar.

Past Graduate Seminars

Upcoming Programs

Friday, January 15, 2016Friday, March 18, 2016
Graduate Seminar
Ten-week graduate seminar
The application deadline has passed
This seminar asks how it might change the study of early modern Europe’s material culture to organize our thinking around one particular type of matter: stone. Using theoretical reference points associated with the “new materialism” and ecocriticism, we will try to think from (or around) the position of stone, stones, and stoniness in a series of different ways:
Thursday, September 29, 2016Thursday, December 8, 2016
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Ten-week graduate seminar
Early application deadline May 1
This course will examine the relationship between gender, sex differences, and politics—defined broadly—in medieval Europe, exploring the ways in which systems of power mapped onto perceived sex differences and bolstered, reproduced, or authenticated those systems.