Latin Vulgate Bible

Latin Vulgate Bible, manuscript on parchment copied in France, probably central France, ca. 1250, formerly in the library of the Dominican friars of Clermont-Ferrand
Latin Vulgate Bible, manuscript on parchment copied in France, probably central France, ca. 1250, formerly in the library of the Dominican friars of Clermont-Ferrand

Latin Vulgate Bible, manuscript on parchment copied in France, probably central France, ca. 1250, formerly in the library of the Dominican friars of Clermont-Ferrand

Vault Case MS 216

Gift of the McCormick Theological Seminary. Cataloged and conserved by a grant from the B. H. Breslauer Foundation, 2010.

The production of portable Latin Bibles was standardized at the University of Paris in about 1235, and these Parisian Bibles, with their conventional order of Biblical books and specific form of modern chapter division, subsequently became models for small-format Bibles copied throughout France in the mid-thirteenth century. Dominican and Franciscan friars in particular relied upon such Bibles (which were mass produced) to compose sermons until well into the age of print. This codex has an ex libris of the Dominicans of Clermont dated in 1575. In the nineteenth century, it was in the library of Lane Theological Seminary, where Calvin Ellis Stowe was Professor of Biblical Literature. The husband of Harriet Beecher Stowe, he played a leading role in building the Lane Library. Lane Theological Seminary merged with the McCormick Theological Seminary in 1932.

Acquisition Date: 
2010