Center for Renaissance Studies Programs | Newberry

Center for Renaissance Studies Programs

Pentecost

Pentecost. Case MS 185, f. 10

The Center for Renaissance Studies works with an international consortium of universities in North America and the United Kingdom. It offers a wide range of scholarly programs and digital and print publications based in the Newberry collection, and provides a locus for a community of scholars who come from all over the world to use the library’s early manuscripts, printed books, and other materials.

Faculty and graduate students from consortium institutions may be eligible to apply for Newberry Renaissance Consortium Grants to travel to the Newberry to attend programs or do research.

Through our reciprocal arrangement with the Folger Institute in Washington, DC, which also works with a consortium of universities, Institute seminar fees are waived for faculty and graduate students at Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies schools upon acceptance of application, in accordance with Folger policy and our agreement. Participants may be eligible to apply to their home institution to use Newberry consortium funds to travel to the Folger for programs or research, with authorization from their school’s Newberry committee.

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Upcoming Programs

Friday, September 16, 2016Friday, December 9, 2016
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Applications accepted through July 1
This special seminar is devoted to creating a broad-based community of graduate students who are at the beginning stages of working on their dissertations in the history of Europe or the Atlantic World, c. 1400-c. 1750. The goal will be to provide comments and criticisms from a larger group of specialists than would be available on any single campus.
Thursday, September 29, 2016Thursday, December 8, 2016
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Ten-week graduate seminar
Application deadline September 1
This course will examine the relationship between gender, sex differences, and politics—defined broadly—in medieval Europe, exploring the ways in which systems of power mapped onto perceived sex differences and bolstered, reproduced, or authenticated those systems.
Friday, September 30, 2016Saturday, October 1, 2016
Mellon Summer Institutes in Vernacular Paleography
The application deadline has passed.
This workshop will provide participants with an introduction to reading and transcribing documents written in Spain and Spanish America from the late fifteenth to the early eighteenth centuries. Although the course sessions will be taught primarily in English, all of the documents will be in Spanish.
Friday, October 7, 2016
Seminar in European Art
Free and open to the public; precirculated papers
Descriptio and the Mundus Creatio ac Fabrica: The Project of Mercator’s Maps Lee Palmer Wandel, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Saturday, October 8, 2016
Milton Seminar
Please register by 10 am Friday, October 7
Scholars have long identified Milton as a “Hebraic” writer fascinated with Judaism as a source of Christianity. But what were the great poet’s sentiments on contemporary Jews and the question of their coexistence with the English?
Thursday, October 13, 2016
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
Cosponsored by the Chicago Shakespeare Theater
Free and open to the public; no registration required
Live performances streamed to movie theatres across the world. Movies watched on television, computer screen and smartphones - and even, occasionally, on the kinds of screens for which they were intended. Plays reconstructed into text messages or as tweets or in blogs or vlogs. Everything from YOLO Juliet to a Downton Abbey Romeo.
Friday, October 14, 2016
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Research Methods Workshop for Early-Career Graduate Students
The application deadline has passed.
The field of eighteenth‐century Shakespeare has recently received renewed attention with the publication of the essay collection Shakespeare in the Eighteenth Century (Fiona Ritchie and Peter Sabor, eds.) by Cambridge University Press (2012), Michael Caines’s volume for the Oxford Shakespeare Topics series (2013) and conference sessions at the American Society for Eighteenth‐Century St
Saturday, October 15, 2016
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
Free and open to the public; no tickets or registration required
“And Crispin Crispian shall ne’er go by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be rememberèd; We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother; be he ne’er so vile This day shall gentle his condition: And gentlemen in England, now a-bed
Wednesday, October 26, 2016
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
Free and open to the public, registration is requested.
Join experts from Chicago Opera Theater (COT), as well as musicologist Linda Austern, in a discussion, and sneak peek performance, of their 2016 production of The Fairy Queen, by Henry Purcell.
Thursday, November 3, 2016
Center for American Indian Studies Programs
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
Since 2012, the Fairbanks Shakespeare Theatre has produced two performances featuring Native languages in the dialogue: Lear Khehkwaii and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, in which the fairies speak Gwich’in Athabaskan, and Bottom alternates between English and Gwich’in as the play unfolds.
Friday, November 4, 2016
Seminar in European Art
Free and open to the public; precirculated papers
“Illustration” as Truth: The Woodcuts in Guazzo’s Compendium Maleficarum (Milan, 1608) Patricia Simons, University of Michigan
Wednesday, November 9, 2016
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
No art forms have escaped the influence of Shakespeare’s creativity—and dance is no exception.
Saturday, November 12, 2016
Eighteenth-Century Seminar
Please register by 10 am Friday, November 11.
Catherine Gallagher has argued that the “rising” novel established a firm concept of fictionality that was widely accepted by the mid-eighteenth century. Why, then, did readers so often insist on the facticity of certain fictions: seeking out a heroine’s grave, for example, or tracking down prototypes for characters?
Wednesday, November 16, 2016
Conversations at the Newberry
Hold the Mirror up to Nature: The Past, Present, and Future of Shakespeare Performance
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
Shakespeare’s plays are filled with fourth-wall-breaking moments in which characters share their methods for successfully performing emotions, political alliances, and gender roles. His work challenges directors and actors to reflect on the very nature of acting, and to adapt as social, technological, and scientific developments change the horizons of possibility on the stage.
Thursday, December 8, 2016
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
Cosponsored by the Chicago Shakespeare Theater
Free and open to the public; no registration required
2016 challenges us not to fall back on the clichés—“greatest writer in English,” “not of an age but for all time”– when we celebrate Shakespeare. No one can deny his myriad literary achievements, but something else is also at work in creating his cultural capital.
Saturday, January 14, 2017
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
NOTE CHANGE OF LOCATION
“Grief fills the room up of my absent child, Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me, Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words, Remembers me of all his gracious parts, Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form: Then have I reason to be fond of grief.”
Thursday, January 26, 2017Saturday, January 28, 2017
Renaissance Graduate Programs
CFP submission deadline: October 16, 2016.
The Center for Renaissance Studies’ annual graduate student conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for emerging scholars to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across the field of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies in Europe, the Americas, and the Mediterranean world.
Saturday, February 25, 2017
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
Free and open to the public; no tickets or registration required
“Our eyes are sentinels unto our judgements, And should give certain judgement what they see; But they are rash sometimes, and tell us wonders Of common things, which when our judgments find, They can then check the eyes, and call them blind.”
Friday, March 3, 2017
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Research Methods Workshop for Early-Career Graduate Students
The application deadline is December 1.
The works of Margaret Cavendish, in both physical and digital form, will serve as the subject matter for this introduction to digital humanities tools and methods. Cavendish’s work has been digitized in the EEBO and Chadwyck-Healy databases, but to our knowledge automated text analysis of her work has not to date been done.
Saturday, March 4, 2017
Eighteenth-Century Seminar
Please register by 10 am Friday, March 3, 2017
We tend to think of Enlightenment-era philosophers as architects of abstraction—not least because they tend to describe themselves that way. This essay tries a different approach; part of a longer project called “Crafts of Enlightenment,” it treats Enlightenment rationality as a hard-won discipline, developed through craft knowledge and habits of labor.
Thursday, March 9, 2017Friday, March 10, 2017
History of the Book Program
A History of the Book Symposium
Please register by 10 am Wednesday, March 8, 2017
Twitter hashtag for the symposium: #NLHOB17 The symposium, designed for a broad audience of undergraduate and graduate students, faculty members, local scholars, and the interested general public, will introduce participants to:
Saturday, March 11, 2017
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Research Methods Workshop for Early-Career Graduate Students
Application deadline December 1
This workshop aims to introduce participants to the practices and contexts of early modern printing, the central themes related to the reception of classical literary criticism, and the key debates which occurred in early modern Italy—crucial issues not only for students of early modern Italian literature, but for all European national traditions, many of whose literary theoretical writings in
Friday, March 17, 2017
Seminar in European Art
Free and open to the public; precirculated papers
Autonomous Empire, Locative Encounter: German Visual Computation c. 1450-1560 Jennifer Nelson, University of Michigan
Tuesday, April 4, 2017
Dante Lecture
Please register by 10 am Monday, April 3, 2017
Description forthcoming. A reception will follow the lecture. Learn more about the speaker: Piero Boitani, Sapienza Università di Roma
Friday, April 28, 2017
Seminar in European Art
Free and open to the public; precirculated papers
Stradano’s Nova Reperta and the Renaissance Representation of Invention and Globalization Lia Markey, The Newberry Library
Saturday, April 29, 2017
Early Modern Studies Program
An Early Modern Studies Symposium
Please register by 10 am Friday, April 28, 2017
Twitter hashtag for the symposium: #NLEM17
Saturday, May 6, 2017
Milton Seminar
Please register by 10 am Friday, May 5, 2017
A paper title and description will be added later. The paper will be precirculated to those who register, for discussion at the seminar. Coffee and refreshments will be served before the seminar. Learn more about the speaker: Paul Stevens, University of Toronto
Saturday, May 6, 2017
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
Free and open to the public; no tickets or registration required
“From women’s eyes this doctrine I derive: They sparkle still the right Promethean fire; They are the books, the arts, the academes, That show, contain, and nourish all the world.”
Thursday, September 14, 2017Saturday, September 16, 2017
Early Modern Studies Program
An Early Modern Studies Conference
This is the third meeting under the general rubric of Politics of Conversion, sponsored by Early Modern Conversions: Religions, Cultures, Cognitive Ecologies, a multi-year SSHRC-funded project. The first, smaller, meeting was held at the University of Warwick in July 2015, and the second at McGill University in June 2016.
Saturday, September 16, 2017
Other Renaissance Programs
By invitation only
Annual meeting for the faculty representatives of the Center for Renaissance Studies consortium institutions. Additional details will be added later. We invite participants to arrive early to attend our Symposium on Early Modern Studies, “Politics of Conversion,” September 21 to 23.