Past Programs in Early Modern History | Newberry

Past Programs in Early Modern History

Past Lectures

Saturday, April 11, 2015
Early Modern Studies Program
Registration is now closed.
This symposium aims to explore the complexities of Latin America during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, grappling with the multiple perspectives of the many Indigenous and European cultures involved in this time of contact and conflict. This is a hybrid program, with two scholarly sessions in the morning and a public keynote address in the afternoon.
Thursday, April 10, 2014Friday, April 11, 2014
Early Modern Studies Program
State trials were the quintessential media events of later Stuart England. The more important of these trials attracted vast public attention, serving as pivot points in the relationship between the governors and the governed.
Friday, November 8, 2013
Early Modern Studies Program
In the modern era one of the primary markers of national identity, the very stuff of blood and belonging, is language. There has been a tendency to project modern readings—or misreadings—of language onto earlier times; however, recent scholarship has suggested that the early modern linguistic world was in fact much more variegated.
Thursday, September 19, 2013Saturday, September 21, 2013
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
Comparing Political Unions in the Late Medieval and Early Modern World, 1350-1801
The study of political union in the late medieval and early modern periods is too often carried out within a conceptual framework derived from models of national statebuilding, in which the unitary nation state is seen as the goal of political development and individual unions are studied in isolation.
Thursday, March 21, 2013Saturday, March 23, 2013
Early Modern Studies Program
In the last thirty years, the study of early modern religious, especially women, has flourished. No longer reserved to historians of religion and spirituality, the field attracts scholars in multiple disciplines: women’s and gender studies, literature, history of art and music, social history, etc.—so much so, in fact, that we lose sight of its full interdisciplinary potential.
Friday, February 22, 2013
Early Modern Studies Program
Diuerse lingue: Thomas Morley and the Problem of National Language in Renaissance Music
Diuerse lingue: Thomas Morley and the Problem of National Language in Renaissance Music
Friday, October 19, 2012
Early Modern Studies Program
This symposium will bring together scholars interested in topics related to Anglo-Dutch relations; English and Dutch colonial efforts; or Native and Indigenous studies as inflected by English and Dutch colonization in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
Friday, October 12, 2012
Early Modern Studies Program
Telling the Story: The Encounter and the Reformation
Thursday, September 20, 2012
Medieval Studies Program
The Poetry of the Stars, from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance
The Poetry of the Stars, from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance
Thursday, November 3, 2011
Early Modern Studies Program
The lachrymose nature of Jewish history has received a good deal of critical re-evaluation over the past several decades, with important and innovative studies shedding light on a range of Jewish and Christian relations throughout medieval and early modern Europe.
Friday, October 14, 2011
Early Modern Studies Program
With the resurgence of interest in the history of sovereignty, the study of the early modern period has gained a new resonance in contemporary critical and political debates.
Thursday, September 15, 2011Saturday, September 17, 2011
Early Modern Studies Program
A Conference in Honor of Sister Ann Ida Gannon, BVM
This conference celebrated a major five-year initiative that will make the Newberry Library one of the nation’s premier centers for research on early modern religion, by conserving and cataloging some 6,000 titles relating to religion, primarily from the early modern period.
Friday, February 11, 2011
Early Modern Studies Program
Directed by Jyotsna G. Singh, Michigan State University, and Matthew Dimmock, University of Sussex.
Friday, November 19, 2010
Early Modern Studies Program
Francis Drake’s unexpected raids on Spain’s overseas colonies in 1577-80 alarmed the Spanish court and its global bureaucracy. The first official response to those raids was the expedition led by Diego Flores de Valdés and Pedro Sarmiento de Gamboa.
Saturday, May 22, 2010
Milton Seminar
A Staged Reading
Saturday, May 15, 2010
Milton Seminar
A (Belated) Celebration of Milton’s 400th Birthday John Milton’s LifeStephen Fallon, University of Notre Dame
Friday, March 12, 2010
Early Modern Studies Program
Richard Hooker’s Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie describes the Church of England as a middle way between dangerous extremes of Catholicism and Presbyterianism.
Saturday, February 20, 2010
Medieval Studies Program
Session 1: Disability in the Middle Ages Chair: Sandra Sufian, University of Illinois at Chicago
Friday, September 25, 2009
Early Modern Studies Program
The Center for Renaissance Studies was established in 1979 as a consortium of five Chicago-area universities, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities.Thirty years later the consortium has grown to fifty member institutions.
Saturday, April 18, 2009
Early Modern Studies Program
Learn more about the speaker: John Morril, Selwin College, University of Cambridge.
Thursday, March 12, 2009
Early Modern Studies Program
Learn more about the speaker: Trevor Burnard, University of Warwick (now at University of Melbourne).
Friday, March 6, 2009
Early Modern Studies Program
Shakespeare and the History of Philosophy
Saturday, February 28, 2009
Early Modern Studies Program
Montaigne-Shakespeare: Biographical and Editorial Crossroads
Thursday, September 25, 2008
Early Modern Studies Program
England’s first chartered society entertained several political and cultural ambitions: the importance of Italian humanist geography in considerations of national history; the invention of two English national traditions, one Roman, one Anglo-Saxon; the elaboration of a body of legal precedent to counteract monarchical experiments with absolutism; the promotion of empire as an atavistic nationa
Thursday, September 25, 2008Saturday, September 27, 2008
Early Modern Studies Program
Re(con)figuring Association and the Impact of European Expansion, 1500-1700
Thursday, March 27, 2008
Early Modern Studies Program
Calculating Engines: Minds, Bodies, Sex, and Machines on the Eve of the EnlightenmentJonathan Sawday, University of Strathclyde (currently at Saint Louis University)
Friday, February 8, 2008
Early Modern Studies Program
Hybridity, mimickry, negotiation, Orientalism, alterity, and the “middleground,” are only a handful of concepts that have redefined the terrain of cultural studies. Building upon this theoretical legacy, this symposium challenged participants to reassess familiar concepts such as the nation-state and to question existing interpretive models.
Thursday, February 7, 2008
Early Modern Studies Program
Professor Grafton’s talk will focus on printers’ correctors in the fifteenth century, and will offer some unusual illustrations as evidence for examining the evolution of correctors’ practices during the transition from manuscript to print publication.
Friday, March 30, 2007
Medieval Studies Program
Sponsored by the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities at Vanderbilt University Welcome Leah S. Marcus, Vanderbilt UniversityHolly Tucker, Vanderbilt University Opening remarks
Saturday, March 17, 2007
Early Modern Studies Program
The Merchant of Venice and the Venice of Merchants
Session 1: The Venice of Merchants Edward Muir, Northwestern UniversityRobert Davis, Ohio State University Charles Rosenberg, University of Notre Dame
Thursday, March 2, 2006Saturday, March 4, 2006
Center for American Indian Studies Programs
This cross-disciplinary conference investigated the enduring significance of space and place in scholarship of the early Americas against the backdrop of the Newberry Library’s world-class cartographic holdings.
Friday, March 11, 2005Saturday, March 12, 2005
Early Modern Studies Program
Conference on Political Economy and State Formation in Early Modern Europe, 1600-1750
Conference on Political Economy and State Formation in Early Modern Europe, 1600-1750 Sponsored by the University of Aberdeen, the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, through Center for Renaissance Studies Consortium funding, and the Research Institute for Irish & Scottish Studies at the University of Aberdeen.
Friday, April 30, 2004Saturday, May 1, 2004
Early Modern Studies Program
This symposium aimed to provide a forum for scholars from a variety of fields to reflect critically on the benefits as well as the costs of comparative work, a discussion that has been surprisingly absent from the current drive for more hemispheric and inclusive approaches to the colonial Americas under the rubric of American Studies or Atlantic Studies.
Friday, December 5, 2003Saturday, December 6, 2003
Early Modern Studies Program
The England of Elizabeth was a time of great cultural development as England sought to find its national identity in a radically changing world. In a time known for explorations, expanded trade, and brilliant literature, at the margins of society lived those who were left out of England’s prosperous white Protestant identity.
Thursday, November 13, 2003Saturday, November 15, 2003
Early Modern Studies Program
Cultural, Political, and Historical Connections between Spain and England, 1554-1604
Wednesday, March 12, 2003
Early Modern Studies Program
American Colonies, Scottish Entrepeneurs, and British State Formation, 1603-1707Allan Macinnes, University of Aberdeen (currently at the University of Strathclyde)
Thursday, January 30, 2003
Early Modern Studies Program
Distance and Memory: American Scenes on a Silver Beaker, Antwerp, c. 1530 Carlo Ginzburg, University of California, Los Angeles Learn more about Center for Renaissance Studies programs.
Friday, October 11, 2002Saturday, October 12, 2002
Early Modern Studies Program
Sponsored by Wayne State University, Miami University, and Kent State University, with additional support from Ohio State University; and organized by Ronald Corthell, Kent State University; Frances E. Dolan, Miami University; Christopher Haley, Ohio State University; and Arthur Marotti, Wayne State University.
Wednesday, September 11, 2002Saturday, September 14, 2002
Medieval Studies Program
Responsabilite scientifique: Dominique de Courcelles, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CERPHl-ENS Lyon.Co-organisateurs: Marcel Tetel, Emeritus, Duke University; Paul Saenger et Carla Zecher, Newberry Library.
Friday, April 19, 2002Saturday, April 20, 2002
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
The Unique Texts and Images in the Colonial Andean Manuscripts of Martin de Murúa and Guaman Poma de Ayala Sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies and the Department of Art History at the University of Chicago, and the Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies and D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History.
Friday, April 5, 2002Sunday, April 7, 2002
Early Modern Studies Program
This conference was made possible through major funding by the Women’s Board of the University of Chicago, and co-sponsorsed by the Adelyn Russell Bogert Fund of the Franke Institute for the Humanities, the Committee on South Asian Studies, the Department of Music, the Humanities Division, and the Weiss Brown Fund, all of the University of Chicago; and the Newberry Center for Renaissance
Thursday, February 21, 2002Sunday, February 24, 2002
Medieval Studies Program
Sponsored by the Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies, The Evelyn Dunbar Memorial Early Music Festival, the Northwestern University School of Music, and the Northwestern University Program in the Study of Imagination. The Evelyn Dunbar Memorial Early Music Festivals have been made possible through the generous support of Northwestern alumni Ruth Dunbar Davee and her late husband, Ken M.
Thursday, March 8, 2001Saturday, March 10, 2001
Early Modern Studies Program
Sponsored by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and the Department of English Language and Literature at the University of Chicago; the Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies; the Humanities Visiting Committee Fund of the Franke Institute for the Humanities; the Gertrude and Meyer Kestenbaum Cultural Activities Fund of the Humanities Division; the Chicago Group on Modern Franc
Thursday, February 22, 2001Saturday, February 24, 2001
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
The colony of New France began with settlements in the St. Lawrence valley in present-day Quebec, then spread to the Upper Midwest, including Illinois. As a French colony, New France was administratively unified. As a region, however, it was far from demographically and culturally homogenous.
Friday, February 2, 2001
Early Modern Studies Program
Lecture: Sappho on the Arno: A Literary Portrait of Laura Battiferra degli Ammannati Workshop: How Shall We Restore the Ladies to Mainstream Literary History? Documents from the Battiferra File Victoria Kirkham, University of Pennsylvania
Friday, September 22, 2000Saturday, September 23, 2000
Medieval Studies Program
Sponsored by the University of Chicago; and by the Department of French and Italian, the Anonymous Fund, the Institute of Research in the Humanities, and the Humanities Center of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Friday, April 28, 2000
Medieval Studies Program
Roundtable Discussion: Women and Religion
Friday, April 21, 2000
Early Modern Studies Program
The Life of Magister Arnulphus—alias Arnoul Greban, Arnolfo Giliardi, and , perhaps, Arnolfo de San Gilleno—Theologian, Singer, Organist, Composer, and Pedagogue Darwin Smith, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique
Friday, March 3, 2000
Early Modern Studies Program
Lecture: Bewitching the President: Gender, Race, and the Politics of Power in Late-17th-Century Guatemala Workshop: Identifying Women’s Cultural Networks through Inquisition Records Martha Few, University of Miami (now at University of Arizona)
Friday, November 12, 1999
Medieval Studies Program
Lecture: Prostitutes, Celebrity, and Print Culture in Renaissance Venice: The Case of Tullia d’AragonaDiana Robin, University of New Mexico, now emerita
Friday, October 15, 1999Saturday, October 16, 1999
Early Modern Studies Program
Sponsored by the Academy of American Franciscan Historians, the Instituto Cervantes of Chicago, the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Chicago and the University of Chicago Franke Institute for the Humanities, the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Loyola University Chicago.
Saturday, October 2, 1999
Early Modern Studies Program
Seville, 1540, to Paris, 1552: de la 'Silva de varia leccion' de Pedra Mexia aux 'Diverse lecons de Pierre messie' par Claude Gruget
This lecture in sixteenth-century literature was sponsored by the University of Chicago, Marquette University, and Northwestern University. Learn about the speaker: Dominique de Courcelles, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Ecole Nationale des Chartes
Friday, October 1, 1999
Early Modern Studies Program
La polemique religieuse a la Renaissance: un genre litteraire
This lecture in sixteenth-century literature was sponsored by the University of Chicago, Marquette University, and Northwestern University. Learn about the speaker: Dominique de Courcelles, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Ecole Nationale des Chartes
Friday, September 24, 1999
Early Modern Studies Program
Lecture: Literally Old Maids: Singlewomen and the Life-Cycle in Early Modern England Workshop: How to Identify Never-Married Women in Records of the Past Amy Froide, University of Tennessee-Chattanooga (now at University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Friday, May 15, 1998Saturday, May 16, 1998
Early Modern Studies Program
Sponsored by Wayne State University, and organized by Michael Giordano, Wayne State University. Friday, May 15 Welcome Michael Giordano, Wayne State University
Monday, April 28, 1997Saturday, May 3, 1997
Medieval Studies Program
The Family, Property, and the State Part of “Teaching Gender in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance,” a series of lectures open to the public, and related workshops open by application to faculty from the Center for Renaissance Studies consortium.
Monday, March 10, 1997Saturday, March 15, 1997
Milton Seminar
Part of “Teaching Gender in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance,” a series of lectures open to the public, and related workshops open by application to faculty from the Center for Renaissance Studies consortium.
Thursday, January 16, 1997Thursday, February 20, 1997
Early Modern Studies Program
Literature, Social Structure, and Nationhood in England, 1580-1780
By the close of the eighteenth century in England, the predominantly urban middle and laboring classes had developed a literary culture independent of th elite, in which political, religious, and cultural crises could be configured.
Monday, December 2, 1996Saturday, December 7, 1996
Medieval Studies Program
Part of “Teaching Gender in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance,” a series of lectures open to the public, and related workshops open by application to faculty from the Center for Renaissance Studies consortium.
Friday, November 15, 1996Saturday, November 16, 1996
Early Modern Studies Program
Participants attended a Shakespeare Repertory production of Hamlet on Friday, November 15, then took part in a series of workshops at the Newberry Library the next day. Sponsored by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and organized by Michael Shapiro, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Monday, October 28, 1996Saturday, November 2, 1996
Medieval Studies Program
Part of “Teaching Gender in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance,” a series of lectures open to the public, and related workshops open by application to faculty from the Center for Renaissance Studies consortium.
Monday, May 13, 1996Saturday, May 18, 1996
Medieval Studies Program
Part of “Teaching Gender in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance,” a series of lectures open to the public, and related workshops open by application to faculty from the Center for Renaissance Studies consortium.
Monday, February 12, 1996Saturday, February 17, 1996
Medieval Studies Program
Part of “Teaching Gender in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance,” a series of lectures open to the public, and related workshops open by application to faculty from the Center for Renaissance Studies consortium.
Friday, November 3, 1995Saturday, November 4, 1995
Early Modern Studies Program
Participants attended a Shakespeare Repertory production of Othello on Friday, November 3, then took part in a series of workshops at the Newberry Library the next day. Sponsored by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and organized by Michael Shapiro, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
Friday, October 27, 1995Saturday, October 28, 1995
Early Modern Studies Program
This conference explored the complex reception of Montaigne in European and non-European cultures from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries. It combined a focus on the conceptual aspects of his reception—how he has been interpreted and understood—with the material history of his reception—the ways in which his works have been printed, translated, edited, and excepted—since 1595.
Thursday, April 27, 1995Saturday, April 29, 1995
Early Modern Studies Program
In the context of the centenary anniversaries of the deaths of Boiardo (d. 1494) and Tasso (d. 1595), this conference considered the evolution of Ferrarese culture in the dramatic period between the late fifteenth and the end of the sixteenth centuries.
Friday, February 10, 1995Saturday, February 11, 1995
Early Modern Studies Program
Publications of chronicles describing the lives of the rich and famous were a characteristic feature of the early modern period. This conference explored connections between high and low culture by focusing on a celebrated example, the Mémoires Secrets de Bachaumont.
Saturday, May 1, 1993
Medieval Studies Program
Focusing on the ramifications of theories of memory for literary theory and practice, art and architecture, historiography, philosophy, and the performing arts, this symposium offered new and diverse perspectives on future directions for studies of the ars memorandi in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.
Friday, November 13, 1992
Medieval Studies Program
Speakers: Albert Ascoli, Northwestern University (now at University of California, Berkeley); JoAnn Cavallo, Columbia University; Lawrence Rhu, University of South Carolina; and
Friday, October 16, 1992Saturday, October 17, 1992
Early Modern Studies Program
This conference sought to examine the prominent place of reason, or rational argumentation, in the literature of early modern France and Italy. Topics covered the aesthetics of polemical writing; reasoning and the formation of subjectivities; resistance to the rhetoric of persuasian; and the rationality of literary pleasure.
Friday, April 24, 1992
Medieval Studies Program
This symposium provided both a broad overview of the Newberry Library Special Collections and a detailed exposition of the library’s strengths in medieval and Renaissance materials. Sponsored by the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Friday, November 22, 1991Saturday, November 23, 1991
Medieval Studies Program
This continued a program initiated in 1988-89 with the goal of integrating music into teaching of other medieval and Renaissance subjects. Teams of faculty from diverse disciplines at selected consortium campuses collaborated to design on-campus symposia to demonstrate points of intersection or parallels between music and other disciplines in the medieval and early modern periods.
Saturday, November 9, 1991
Medieval Studies Program
Rhetoric and Personal Expression in the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance
Christine de Pisan and Michel de Montaigne represent two eras connected by unmistakable bonds of tradition and affinity. Through an examination of the discourses of these two authors, workshop participants considered questions of historical continuity and discontinuity; aesthetic and ideological symmetries and dissymmetries; gender-based particularity; and cultural rootedness.
Friday, May 3, 1991Saturday, May 4, 1991
Medieval Studies Program
Women and Gender in the Middle Ages and Renaissance
Tuesday, March 19, 1991Tuesday, April 23, 1991
Medieval Studies Program
The Culture of Flowers
This seminar focused on the appearance and commodification of flowers in medieval and Renaissance Europe, exploring the symbolic, aesthetic, and economic status of flowers as an aspect of the growth of capitalism.
Friday, February 2, 1990Saturday, February 3, 1990
Medieval Studies Program
This symposium was designed to provide both a broad overview of the Newberry Library Special Collections and a detailed exposition of some of the library’s strengths. Friday, February 2
Friday, April 14, 1989Sunday, April 16, 1989
Early Modern Studies Program
Descartes in Context
This conference considered the background of late Renaissance humanism, scholasticism, and skepticism in which the thought of Descartes developed and changed. Speakers from the disciplines of history, philosophy, and literature explored the historical context of Descartes’ thought.
Tuesday, October 4, 1988
Early Modern Studies Program
Ceremony and Text in the Renaissance
This seminar considered implications for Renaissance literary works of the changing status of ritual and ceremony during the early modern period. The discussion focused on specific texts dealing with ecclesiastical and civic ritual, as well as others drawn from the literary canon.
Friday, May 13, 1988Saturday, May 14, 1988
Early Modern Studies Program
This conference focused on issues and methodologies important to the late Eric Cochrane.
Tuesday, December 1, 1987Thursday, December 3, 1987
Early Modern Studies Program
The focus of this workshop was the fourteenth-century fresco cycle known as the Buon Governo by Ambrogio Lorenzetti in Siena’s Palazzo Pubblico. Learn about the workshop director: Quentin Skinner, University of Cambridge (now at Queen Mary, University of London)
Friday, May 1, 1987
Early Modern Studies Program
Logic
This was a public lecture held in conjunction with an eight-week seminar led by David Wagner, Northern Illinois University, that provided a general survey of the liberal arts during the Renaissance, asking specifically how the Renaissance tradition differs
Friday, April 17, 1987
Early Modern Studies Program
Grammar
This was a public lecture held in conjunction with an eight-week seminar led by David Wagner, Northern Illinois University, that provided a general survey of the liberal arts during the Renaissance, asking specifically how the Renaissance tradition differs
Friday, April 3, 1987
Early Modern Studies Program
Rhetoric
This was a public lecture held in conjunction with an eight-week seminar led by David Wagner, Northern Illinois University, that provided a general survey of the liberal arts during the Renaissance, asking specifically how the Renaissance tradition differs
Wednesday, April 1, 1987Wednesday, June 10, 1987
Early Modern Studies Program
Audrey Lumsden Kouvel, University of Illinois at Chicago, now emerita
Friday, March 6, 1987
Early Modern Studies Program
Astronomy
This was a public lecture held in conjunction with an eight-week seminar led by David Wagner, Northern Illinois University, that provided a general survey of the liberal arts during the Renaissance, asking specifically how the Renaissance tradition differs
Friday, February 27, 1987
Early Modern Studies Program
Music
This was a public lecture held in conjunction with an eight-week seminar led by David Wagner, Northern Illinois University, that provided a general survey of the liberal arts during the Renaissance, asking specifically how the Renaissance tradition differs
Friday, February 13, 1987
Early Modern Studies Program
Geometry
This was a public lecture held in conjunction with an eight-week seminar led by David Wagner, Northern Illinois University, that provided a general survey of the liberal arts during the Renaissance, asking specifically how the Renaissance tradition differs
Friday, January 30, 1987
Early Modern Studies Program
Arithmetic
This was a public lecture held in conjunction with an eight-week seminar led by David Wagner, Northern Illinois University, that provided a general survey of the liberal arts during the Renaissance, asking specifically how the Renaissance tradition differs
Friday, January 16, 1987Friday, May 1, 1987
Early Modern Studies Program
This eight-week seminar, led by David Wagner, Northern Illinois University, provided a general survey of the liberal arts during the Renaissance, asking specifically how the Renaissance tradition differs from those of the medieval and modern periods.
Tuesday, May 20, 1986Thursday, May 29, 1986
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
Anatomy of a Vendetta in Renaissance Italy
Vendetta in Renaissance Italy constituted a rich body of cultural lore, and the pursuit of revenge often defined a family’s kinship and clientage obligations.
Monday, April 7, 1986
Early Modern Studies Program
Rembrandt: A Master in the StudioSvetlana Alpers, University of California, Berkeley Session 1: Life in the Studio Session 2: The Real Thing
Thursday, April 3, 1986Saturday, April 5, 1986
Medieval Studies Program
This conference focused on the interaction between aspects of law and the humanities. Sponsored by Northeastern Illinois University with support from the American Bar Foundation and the American Society for Legal History and organized by Sue Sheridan Walker, Northeastern Illinois University.
Wednesday, February 12, 1986
Early Modern Studies Program
Directed by Mark Girouard
Tuesday, October 22, 1985
Medieval Studies Program
This seminar concentrated on urban violence related to particular periods and events; for example, the destruction of buildings seen as symbols of power, and pillages, particularly those against Jews, that accompanied elections of new popes, deaths of popes, and the accession to power of secular princes.
Thursday, October 17, 1985Saturday, October 19, 1985
Early Modern Studies Program
This conference considered the Inquisition from the perspectives of comparative legal and institutional history. A related exhibit, Faith, Law, and Dissent: The Inquisition in the Early Modern World was on display at the Newberry Library from October 7 to December 7, 1985.
Tuesday, April 2, 1985
Early Modern Studies Program
Popular Print Culture in Early Modern SocietiesRoger Chartier, Centre de Recherches Historiques, Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, now at the University of Pennsylvania
Tuesday, March 19, 1985Wednesday, March 20, 1985
Early Modern Studies Program
Directed by Lawrence Stone, Princeton University Session 1, Tuesday, March 19: The Programs and the Documentation Session 2, Wednesday, March 20: Money, Sex, and Murder—A Case Study and Its Meaning Supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Wednesday, January 9, 1985Thursday, January 10, 1985
Early Modern Studies Program
Directed by Lionel Gossman, Princeton University (now emeritus)
Saturday, May 19, 1984
Early Modern Studies Program
This conference was held in conjunction with a series of workshops sponsored by the Center for Renaissance Studies during the 1983-84 academic year, that focused on methodology and training in the techniques needed to conduct research with original sources in Renaissance studies.
Thursday, May 3, 1984
Early Modern Studies Program
Directed by Jean-Claude Margolin, University of Tours This was one of a series of workshops sponsored by the Center for Renaissance Studies during the 1983-84 academic year, that focused on methodology and training in the techniques needed to conduct research with original sources in Renaissance studies.
Thursday, April 12, 1984Friday, April 13, 1984
Early Modern Studies Program
This working conference was designed to assess the present state of French Renaissance literary studies. Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and organized by Marcel Tetel, Duke University. Thursday, April 12
Thursday, March 29, 1984Saturday, March 31, 1984
Medieval Studies Program
This conference centered around the question of how chivalry as an ideal could have exerted such influence on literature and the arts, long after it had disappeared as a social reality. All sessions were held at Loyola University Chicago School of Law.
Thursday, March 15, 1984Tuesday, April 17, 1984
Early Modern Studies Program
Directed by Marc Fumaroli, Université Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV) Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Session 1, March 15. Introduction to Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Rhetorical Culture
Tuesday, November 29, 1983Tuesday, December 6, 1983
Early Modern Studies Program
Directed by D. P. Walker, Warburg Institute, University of London, emeritus Two workshops: November 29 and December 6
Thursday, November 10, 1983
Medieval Studies Program
Directed by Lilian Randall, Curator of Manuscripts, Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore This was one of a series of workshops sponsored by the Center for Renaissance Studies during the 1983-84 academic year, that focused on methodology and training in the techniques needed to conduct research with original sources in Renaissance studies.
Tuesday, October 18, 1983
Early Modern Studies Program
Directed by Theo Bögels, University of Leiden This was one of a series of workshops sponsored by the Center for Renaissance Studies during the 1983-84 academic year, that focused on methodology and training in the techniques needed to conduct research with original sources in Renaissance studies.
Friday, May 20, 1983Sunday, August 21, 1983
Early Modern Studies Program
Organized by Mary Beth Rose, Center for Renaissance Studies (now at University of Illinois at Chicago) Friday, May 20 Session 1
Friday, April 23, 1982Saturday, April 24, 1982
Early Modern Studies Program
Organized by Ian Thomson, Indiana University (now emeritus) Friday, April 23 Welcome
Saturday, April 11, 1981
Early Modern Studies Program
Keynote speaker Peter Burke, Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge (now emeritus) Learn more about Center for Renaissance Studies programs.
Saturday, April 19, 1980
Early Modern Studies Program
Organized by W. Brown Patterson, Davidson College. Welcome Richard Brown, The Newberry Library Session 1 Olivares and the Europe of the Thirty Years WarJ. H. Elliott, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton (now emeritus)
Thursday, April 19, 1979Saturday, April 21, 1979
Early Modern Studies Program
The Renaissance Conference was held annually at the Newberry Library for many years prior to the founding of the Center for Renaissance Studies in 1979.
Saturday, April 15, 1978
Early Modern Studies Program
The Renaissance Conference was held at the Newberry Library for many years prior to the founding of the Center for Renaissance Studies in 1979. Organized by Raymond Waddington, University of Wisconsin-Madison (now at University of California, Davis)
Friday, April 8, 1977Saturday, April 9, 1977
Early Modern Studies Program
The Renaissance Conference was held at the Newberry Library for many years prior to the founding of the Center for Renaissance Studies in 1979. Organized by Anthony Molho, Brown University Friday, April 8 Welcome Lawrence W. Taylor, Newberry LibraryAnthony Molho, Brown University
Saturday, April 3, 1976
Early Modern Studies Program
The Renaissance Conference was held at the Newberry Library for many years prior to the founding of the Center for Renaissance Studies in 1979. Organized by Hanns Gross, Loyola University Chicago, and Robert Bireley, Loyola University Chicago. Welcome Richard Brown, Newberry Library
Saturday, April 26, 1975
Medieval Studies Program
The Renaissance Conference was held at the Newberry Library for many years prior to the founding of the Center for Renaissance Studies in 1979. Organized by Julius Kirshner, University of Chicago. Welcome Richard Brown, Newberry Library
Saturday, May 4, 1974
Medieval Studies Program
The Renaissance Conference was held at the Newberry Library for many years prior to the founding of the Center for Renaissance Studies in 1979. Organized by Aldo Scaglione, University of North Carolina. Welcome Lawrence W. Towner, Newberry Library
Saturday, May 5, 1973
Early Modern Studies Program
The Renaissance Conference was held at the Newberry Library for many years prior to the founding of the Center for Renaissance Studies in 1979. Organized by John Wallace, University of Chicago. Session 1 Form and Value in the Shakespearean History PlayDavid Kastan, University of Chicago
Saturday, May 8, 1971
Early Modern Studies Program
The Renaissance Conference was held at the Newberry Library for many years prior to the founding of the Center for Renaissance Studies in 1979. Organized by William Schutte, Lawrence University. Session 1 Asia in the Language and Literature of the Cinquecento Donald Lach, University of Chicago