Pomes de Tear

I am beset once again by poetry. I have been inundated with literary magazines lately, and those two volumes of Hit Parader, as mentioned, and on top of all that, someone has given me a copy of Dr. Albert’s collection of his own prose and poetry, the only secondhand copy of this limited scholarly edition I’ve ever seen. (All the other copies I have of this book, which contains his epic, “Sad Are the Sad” among other works of lesser length, came to me through his estate. I was really unaware anybody else had one.)

So much poetry, so much of it utterly unread for half a century, made me start to see double, or were those couplets? Maybe it’s the cold medicine. While I was measuring out a jigger…teaspoon of it, the books all fell together and some of Dr. Albert’s stanzas landed amid some stanzas from pop songs of the mid-50s (the individual bits of which should be recognized as the property of their owners and just briefly engaged in misbehavior) to form a kind of Cheerful Over the Coffee Morning Song which would have been a hit about sixty years ago. You can probably guess which lines are whose, fearless reader, but why not pretend you can’t, just to make me happy?

There is a man who can play you a tune

Happiest tune and night or noon

He’ll play this tune

Just by striking a spoon

On water tumblers of glass

Start the water tumbler tune:

One awakes in the morning

To face the world once again,

Inquires the reasons for being

Asking why, wherefore, and when:

Escape the sad

Ever from some place of poor breadth

Or from some unwanted cad

But never free until death,

So when temptation tries to take your soul,

The rock of love won’t let you roll;

Our gaze turns to the soft sky

Moved by its calmness on high

We are inspired to assume

A need exists to resume

Boom boom boom de-a-da

Boom boom boom de-a-da

Boom de-a-da boom.

(All my apologies to Dr. Albert, and to the authors of Rock Love, The Water Tumbler Tune, and Dixie Danny. Gotta be the cold medicine.) 

Post New Comment