Programs and Events | Newberry

Programs and Events

The Newberry offers programming in the humanities for scholars, teachers, and the general public. Unless otherwise noted, events are free, and no reservations are required. Many of our programs are recorded, and you can listen to them on our website.

E.g., 07/16/2018
E.g., 07/16/2018
Wednesday, April 11, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
This seminar will explore how cultural production intersected with protest politics to impact Chicago’s urban development between the Great Depression and the Chicago Freedom Movement.
Tuesday, April 17, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
This seminar will offer tools for reading and writing Creative nonfiction, including personal essay, travel writing, memoir and biomythography. We’ll use as our inspiration short writings by James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Zadie Smith, Angela Morales, Gloria Anzaldua and others.
Wednesday, April 18, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
Many social sciences classes involve economic theories even if they aren’t “economics” classes. This class will provide non economists (or those new to economics) an understanding of important economics concepts. Are supply and demand curves really that important to the market? What is a tariff and do they help protect local jobs? Does a minimum wage hurt or help an economy?
Thursday, April 19, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
Since the Enlightenment, the myth of the African past has depicted Africans as isolated from history, destined to live in static “tribal” societies until the forces of change intruded in the form of colonial conquest.
Wednesday, April 25, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
Really short poems-just one, two, three, or four lines long-are a superb resource for teaching the art of close reading. Because they’re so short, they ease the anxiety students often have about poetry as an art form, and they can be integrated into a longer class period as a “warm-up” or “cool-down” exercise, helping teachers cultivate close reading as a habit.
Thursday, April 26, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
This seminar will offer tools for reading and writing Creative nonfiction, including personal essay, travel writing, memoir and biomythography. We’ll use as our inspiration short writings by James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Zadie Smith, Angela Morales, Gloria Anzaldua and others.
Friday, April 27, 2018
Chicagoans often attribute much of what’s right about our city’s infrastructure to Daniel Burnham and his 1909 Plan of Chicago (co-written with Edward Bennett).
Thursday, June 7, 2018
This seminar will examine Shakespeare and women from two points of view. First, the plays themselves, and the question of whether a large-scale “woman project” is visible or thinkable across the long arc of Shakespeare’s career. Second a look into the Newberry’s collections at famous women performers of Shakespeare.
Friday, June 8, 2018
In his book Love and Death in the American Novel (1960), Leslie Fiedler asked, “why has the tale of terror so special an appeal to Americans?” The gothic literary genre is vast, with dark iconic themes including death, madness, and the supernatural. In British classics like Wuthering Heights, we get the mysterious moors, and in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr.
Monday, July 16, 2018Friday, July 20, 2018
A Five-Day Professional Development Seminar for Teachers
The application deadline has passed
In this 5-day sequence at the Newberry Library, high school teachers will pursue an exciting inquiry into the Founders’ political philosophy. Lectures, discussions, and workshops will bring to life the fundamental arguments of the Founding, which continue to animate our political life.
Friday, October 12, 2018
Because of its intimidating grandeur, Shakespeare’s King Lear is rightly regarded by many as the Mount Everest of English literature. The masterwork can certainly be overwhelming in its scope. Therefore, reading is sometimes easier if one starts with a particular angle of approach.
Monday, October 15, 2018
“You too have been spellbound by magical voices, sweet voices with strange melodies… . You have angered people you should not have.”
Wednesday, October 17, 2018
How has current US foreign policy impacted globalization and trade in the world economy?
Friday, November 2, 2018
The last 25 years have witnessed growing partisan polarization and intensifying party conflict. Some evidence indicates that partisanship has supplanted race as the main social cleavage in America. Anecdotally, we see it as people de-friend and block each other on social media.
Wednesday, November 7, 2018
This seminar explores representations of immigration to France in literature and culture, focusing on the topics of responses to French universalism and the choice to write in French as an adopted language.