Digital Resources by Type | Newberry

Digital Resources by Type

Explore the Newberry through online collections, exhibitions, and publications.

All Digital Resources

The materials displayed here represent important periods in the intertwined histories of American Indians and the European and American settlers who began to arrive in the region in the late seventeenth century. The archival materials presented reveal a story of change and continuity; a necessary paradox for American Indians.
This exhibition presents an overview of the Mexican Revolution as a historic event in which individuals, groups, and social classes pursued diverse goals to achieve political, economic, and social change. It also highlights several definitive political and military moments during the Revolution, as well as the people who witnessed and shaped it.
This virtual exhibition is based on The Aztecs and the Making of Colonial Mexico, a display of original manuscripts, books, and other materials at the Newberry from September 28, 2006 through January 13, 2007. The virtual exhibit includes the complete text from the original gallery exhibit and digitized images of many of the manuscripts and books that were displayed.
This project aims to provide a more complete understanding of the complex nexus of issues, events, and people that contributed to the causes and effects of the Civil War.
Creating Shakespeare explores how Shakespeare–contrary to Ben Jonson’s famous phrase–was both of an age and for all time, through an examination of how he created his works.
In the winter of 1904-1905, Daniel Burnham, the Chicago architect and future co-author of the Plan of Chicago, traveled to the Philippines.
This exhibition explores the life and reign of Elizabeth I, examining how her unique personality was forged and why her legend has endured.
This exhibit traces the emigration of French Canadian populations to the Midwest. Following some key French Canadians like Pierre Menard and Father Chiniquy, this project looks at the influence they had over time and how French Canadian settlements developed in the Midwest throughout the Nineteenth century.
By combining image galleries and original scholarship, this exhibit explores how central North America first became known as the “Frontier” and eventually as the “Heartland.”
Based on an exhibition originally mounted at the Newberry, this website explores how two histories, that of the United States and that of Indian peoples along the expedition route, came together two hundred years ago and how they remain intertwined today.
In the form of original scholarship and images, this exhibit charts the political and personal course of Lincoln’s views leading up to and during his presidency.
This exhibit provides an overview of exploration and early European cartography from 1534-1710.
This exhibit is meant to encourage civic engagement with the struggles over democracy and citizenship, which have occupied Chicagoans for the duration of the city’s political history.
Helen Balfour Morrison (1900-1984), a white photographer from Chicago’s North Shore, traveled at least three times over a decade to Kentucky’s Inner Bluegrass region to photograph African Americans of the rural freetowns or hamlets surrounding Lexington.
Religious Change and Print, 1450-1700 explores the intersection of religion and print culture during the early modern period.
This exhibition presents Renaissance editions of Dante’s Divine Comedy from the John A. Zahm, C.S.C., Dante Collection at the University of Notre Dame, together with selected treasures from the Newberry Library.