Programs and Events | Newberry

Programs and Events

The Newberry offers programming in the humanities for lifelong learners, students, teachers, scholars, and genealogy researchers. Please visit the individual program pages below for information about how to register in advance.

Watch or listen to past programs on the Newberry’s YouTube channel.

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E.g., 10/24/2021
E.g., 10/24/2021
Tuesday, September 21, 2021
Led by Steven Venturino.
Virtual
George Eliot’s novel, Daniel Deronda, is ambitious, challenging, and astonishingly multidimensional. Eliot blends a provocative examination of marriage and personal aspiration with a meditation on Jewish identity in Victorian Britain.This seminar invites participants to immerse themselves in the world of the novel by reading and discussing it in consecutive parts.
Tuesday, September 21, 2021
In-person
Not confined to America, Britain, or Scandinavia, great murder mysteries can be found across the world—including Latin America. In this seminar, we will read a new mystery from a different country every week, discussing how location and culture add to the nature of the mystery
Wednesday, September 22, 2021
Led by Susan Bazargan.
Virtual (Full - Register for Waitlist on Learning Stream)
February 2, 2022, marks the centennial of the publication of James Joyce’s novel Ulysses, a landmark event that altered the aesthetics of modern literature. To celebrate, we will read the entirety of the book, focusing on the first ten chapters during fall 2021 and the last eight in winter/spring 2022.
Wednesday, September 22, 2021
Led by Tony Papanikolas.
Cancelled
Recently, the language of illicit conspiracy has returned to mainstream political debates in the US. Though seemingly a digital phenomenon, the origins of these themes date back to at least the nineteenth-century. In this seminar, we will approach the idea of “conspiracy” through the lens of literature.
Saturday, September 25, 2021
Led by Julia Kriventsova Denne.
Virtual
In this course, we will focus on a close analysis of Bulgakov’sThe Master and Margarita, as well as his shorter satirical work, supplementing our discussion with background and contextual information.
Tuesday, September 28, 2021
Led by Joseph Heininger.
Virtual
Contemporary Irish poetry is among the richest and most diverse in the world. Irish poets write from the perspectives of rural, suburban, and urban lives, portraying familial ties, intimacies, and disturbances, and addressing the influx of new people and ideas to Ireland.
Wednesday, September 29, 2021
Led by Esther Hershenhorn.
Virtual (Full - Register for Waitlist on Learning Stream)
This workshop focuses on how to create and write a successful children’s picture book that will connect with today’s young readers and our ever-changing marketplace.
Thursday, September 30, 2021
Led by Annalese Duprey, PhD
Cancelled
In the ancient and medieval worlds, certain forms of love were diagnosed—and treated—as medical illnesses.In this seminar, we’ll examine how the idea of love-as-sickness gives us insight into cultural assumptions about this nearly universal experience and provides a springboard to examine the rise and fall of diseases as medical and cultural phenomena.
Tuesday, October 5, 2021
Led by Brian Lynch
Virtual
In this discussion-based seminar, we will explore the role of distinct Chicago neighborhoods in contemporary American fiction, asking whether 1940s Bronzeville, 1980s Pilsen, and 1980s Boys’ Town provide more than literary stages for narratives and act as key players in their own right
Wednesday, October 6, 2021
Led by Zorimar Rivera Montes.
Cancelled
In the 1960s, Puerto Rican poets in the U.S. created an important poetry movement called “Nuyorican poetry,” which combined the innovative use of jazz, salsa, hip-hop, and spoken word in poems with a commitment to social justice that called out the disenfranchisement of Puerto Ricans in the United States.
Tuesday, October 12, 2021
Led by Richard Reeder.
Virtual
We will read, discuss, and analyze three of Philip Roth’s novels: American Pastoral, I Married a Communist, and The Human Stain.This trilogy explores the complexity of the American character in ways that continue to resonate stingingly today, as our nation deals with difficult, and sometimes painful, moral and political challenges
Thursday, October 28, 2021
Led by Harrison Sherrod.
Cancelled
Conspiracy theories, secret histories, fake news—paranoia seems to have permeated mainstream culture as the prevailing affect of our strange, uncertain times. Cinema has provided us with many textbook illustrations of paranoia, from portrayals of delusional psychosis to mysteries in which everyone is a suspect.
Saturday, October 30, 2021
Led by Mark Pohlad
Cancelled
This course examines how Abraham Lincoln has been represented in American films (rather than documentaries or television productions) through in-class viewing of select scenes and informed discussion.Throughout, we shall discuss how all aspects of these productions—their direction, actors, costumes, musical scores, etc.—contribute to the treatment of Lincoln
Wednesday, November 3, 2021
Led by Sara Černe.
Virtual
Over the span of a hundred years, Chicago grew from a town of a few thousand people to a quintessentially American metropolis. Whose voices define the city, which narratives have been forgotten in public memory, and how does this tapestry of different histories, origins, and perspectives contribute to the vision of the city in the popular imagination?
Thursday, December 2, 2021
Led by Steven J. Venturino.
Virtual
This seminar will focus on a three-part reading of Kazuo Ishiguro’s most recent novel, Klara and the Sun. The sequential format of reading and discussion will allow participants to explore and appreciate Ishiguro’s engaging yet challenging style as the novel unfolds its own exploration of technology, love, memory, neglect, and perception.
Thursday, December 2, 2021
Led by Katrina A Kemble.
Virtual
“For most of history, Anonymous was a woman.” – Virginia Woolf. This seminar will explore famous and successful women writers who hid their gender identity by publishing under gender- neutral or male names or by simply signing off “Anonymous.”