Programs and Events | Newberry

Programs and Events

The Newberry offers programming in the humanities for scholars, teachers, and the general public. Unless otherwise noted, events are free, and no reservations are required. Many of our programs are recorded, and you can listen to them on our website.

E.g., 12/14/2018
E.g., 12/14/2018
Wednesday, April 11, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
This seminar will explore how cultural production intersected with protest politics to impact Chicago’s urban development between the Great Depression and the Chicago Freedom Movement.
Tuesday, April 17, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
This seminar will offer tools for reading and writing Creative nonfiction, including personal essay, travel writing, memoir and biomythography. We’ll use as our inspiration short writings by James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Zadie Smith, Angela Morales, Gloria Anzaldua and others.
Wednesday, April 18, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
Many social sciences classes involve economic theories even if they aren’t “economics” classes. This class will provide non economists (or those new to economics) an understanding of important economics concepts. Are supply and demand curves really that important to the market? What is a tariff and do they help protect local jobs? Does a minimum wage hurt or help an economy?
Thursday, April 19, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
Since the Enlightenment, the myth of the African past has depicted Africans as isolated from history, destined to live in static “tribal” societies until the forces of change intruded in the form of colonial conquest.
Wednesday, April 25, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
Really short poems-just one, two, three, or four lines long-are a superb resource for teaching the art of close reading. Because they’re so short, they ease the anxiety students often have about poetry as an art form, and they can be integrated into a longer class period as a “warm-up” or “cool-down” exercise, helping teachers cultivate close reading as a habit.
Thursday, April 26, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
This seminar will offer tools for reading and writing Creative nonfiction, including personal essay, travel writing, memoir and biomythography. We’ll use as our inspiration short writings by James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Zadie Smith, Angela Morales, Gloria Anzaldua and others.
Friday, April 27, 2018
Chicagoans often attribute much of what’s right about our city’s infrastructure to Daniel Burnham and his 1909 Plan of Chicago (co-written with Edward Bennett).
Thursday, June 7, 2018
This seminar will examine Shakespeare and women from two points of view. First, the plays themselves, and the question of whether a large-scale “woman project” is visible or thinkable across the long arc of Shakespeare’s career. Second a look into the Newberry’s collections at famous women performers of Shakespeare.
Friday, June 8, 2018
In his book Love and Death in the American Novel (1960), Leslie Fiedler asked, “why has the tale of terror so special an appeal to Americans?” The gothic literary genre is vast, with dark iconic themes including death, madness, and the supernatural. In British classics like Wuthering Heights, we get the mysterious moors, and in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr.
Monday, July 16, 2018Friday, July 20, 2018
A Five-Day Professional Development Seminar for Teachers
The application deadline has passed
In this 5-day sequence at the Newberry Library, high school teachers will pursue an exciting inquiry into the Founders’ political philosophy. Lectures, discussions, and workshops will bring to life the fundamental arguments of the Founding, which continue to animate our political life.
Thursday, October 4, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
In the nearly three decades since critical race theorist Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw first published “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex” to describe the complexity of identity and injustice, the term “intersectionality” has become a cultural meme.
Wednesday, October 10, 2018
War, as a certain popular lyric goes, is good for absolutely nothing. But can it help us see ourselves in a different light? In this seminar, we will use this guiding question in order to explore how some of the most important events in American military history have given rise to new ways of conceiving of the United States and of the various aspects of life within it.
Thursday, October 11, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
Those of us who work with adolescents and young adults are working with the most anxious generation of young people in recent history. Educators and researchers alike believe that social media is a contributing factor to the anxiety epidemic. What exactly does social science research tell us about the link between social media and anxiety?
Friday, October 12, 2018
Because of its intimidating grandeur, Shakespeare’s King Lear is rightly regarded by many as the Mount Everest of English literature. The masterwork can certainly be overwhelming in its scope. Therefore, reading is sometimes easier if one starts with a particular angle of approach.
Friday, October 12, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
Those of us who work with adolescents and young adults are working with the most anxious generation of young people in recent history. Educators and researchers alike believe that social media is a contributing factor to the anxiety epidemic. What exactly does social science research tell us about the link between social media and anxiety?
Monday, October 15, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
“You too have been spellbound by magical voices, sweet voices with strange melodies… . You have angered people you should not have.”
Tuesday, October 16, 2018
“You too have been spellbound by magical voices, sweet voices with strange melodies… . You have angered people you should not have.” Thus Bob Dylan explains (in his 2016 Nobel Prize Lecture) how the Homeric Odyssey inspires his own bardic compositions.
Wednesday, October 17, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
How has current US foreign policy impacted globalization and trade in the world economy?
Thursday, October 18, 2018
The history of the relationship between Ireland and Britain is one fraught with religious tensions, rebellion, political activism, outright war and sometimes fragile peace. In this seminar, we will examine the history of the “Irish Question,” or the Irish pursuit of national autonomy, within the wider context of European, colonial, and contemporary history.
Tuesday, October 23, 2018
The 2014 film Belle was inspired by a late eighteenth-century painting featuring two well dressed young women, one apparently black and one apparently white. Each of the historical figures depicted had spent part of her youth in the home and care of Britain’s powerful Chief Justice, Lord Mansfield, who was related to both.
Thursday, October 25, 2018
Simultaneous events in such disparate places as Arizona, Morocco and Hungary have suddenly made the subject of border walls highly relevant once again. This seminar explores the evolution of border infrastructures as tools of statecraft in global history.
Friday, October 26, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
According to most critical discussions of Toni Morrison’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Beloved (1987), this influential novel sits comfortably under the umbrella of the magical realist genre.
Tuesday, October 30, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
Americans tend to associate Islam with the Middle East, but in fact far more Muslims live outside that area than within it. Nearly 100 million Muslims live in Nigeria alone, more than the population of Egypt and more than the population of all the Arabian states combined.
Thursday, November 1, 2018
The theme of this seminar is TRANSFORMATION. The location of cities and their patterns of growth are dependent in part on the characteristics of their physical environment.
Friday, November 2, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
The last 25 years have witnessed growing partisan polarization and intensifying party conflict. Some evidence indicates that partisanship has supplanted race as the main social cleavage in America. Anecdotally, we see it as people de-friend and block each other on social media.
Wednesday, November 7, 2018
This seminar explores representations of immigration to France in literature and culture, focusing on the topics of responses to French universalism and the choice to write in French as an adopted language.
Monday, November 12, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
American politics has become increasingly charged and seemingly more polarized over the past few national election cycles. Elections seem more high-stakes than ever, and we see heightened scrutiny of campaign strategies, voter turnout levels, and voting districts.
Wednesday, December 5, 2018
The last 25 years have witnessed growing partisan polarization and intensifying party conflict. This session will focus first on political polarization and main factors contributing to political polarization: increasing economic inequality and the growing divisions along educational and geographic lines that impact social identity, culture, and political preferences.
Thursday, December 6, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
The war and its aftermath created legacies that are still with us. While we will not cover specifics of the conflict, we will examine the historical impact of the war on the the rest of the twentieth century, as well as its lingering aftershocks to the present.
Tuesday, December 11, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
“Publish my name and hang up my picture as that of the tenderest lover,” Whitman asks in “Live Oak With Moss.” This would be a seminar on Whitman as a love poet, reading him not only historically, in terms of what his poems can teach us about love in mid-to-late-19th century America, but also aesthetically, in terms of how he enacts ideas of love in his compositional choices, and more philosoph
Wednesday, December 12, 2018
Full. Waitlist only.
This seminar will explore the visual culture of the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893, in conjunction with the Newberry’s fall 2018 thematic exhibition, Pictures from an Exposition: Visualizing the 1893 World’s Fair. The seminar will begin with a classroom discussion of the readings and of images of the fair in various artistic media.