Calendar

E.g., 09/20/2014
E.g., 09/20/2014
Saturday, September 20, 2014
George Kennan and American Diplomacy

9 am - 4 pm

The short book American Diplomacy, 1900–1950 by the late scholar-diplomat George F. Kennan, is an unusual classic: a critique of US foreign policy widely used in the training of american diplomats. Participants will discuss this text and and assess whether there is a place in the foreign policy of a democracy for Kennan’s “realist” style of dispassionate analysis.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Victoria and Edward VII: The British Monarchy, 1837–1910

10 am - Noon

The Victorian and Edwardian periods encompassed enormous social, political, and cultural changes.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Inanna: Sumeria's Erotic Goddess, and Solomon's Song

 1 – 3 pm

Inanna’s story may be the oldest on earth. In it, the goddess copes with a serpent-infested tree, tricks the god of wisdom, builds human civilization, delights in extravagant sexual joy, and descends to the underworld.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
How War Changed Women: Perspectives on British Life, Fiction, and Fashion during World War I

5:45 - 7:45 pm

This class is full and registration has closed.

This seminar considers the lives of British women from the years leading up to the Great War through its aftermath (1910–1925). As women coped with wartime, they forged and expressed new identities through memoirs, novels, imagery, and dress.

Thursday, September 25, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Queen of Instruments: The Violin and Its Music

2 - 4 pm

Traceable to the harp and lyre of antiquity, as well as to the medieval fiddle, the violin began to acquire its present shape and character in the seventeenth century. At first it was an ensemble instrument, but its possibilities as a solo instrument were soon recognized.

Saturday, September 27, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Louis XIV, His Court, and Seventeenth–Century France

1 - 3 pm

This class has been cancelled.

This course offers a well-rounded introduction to Louis XIV’s energetic and complex personality, his complicated love-life, his sophisticated political skills, and his accomplishments in the expansion and modernization of France. Nancy Mitford’s deeply researched The Sun King and W. H.

Tuesday, September 30, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Marcel Proust's The Guermantes Way

6 - 7:30 pm

The third volume of In Search of Lost Time, Proust’s monumental novel, is a dazzling portrait of the salon society of late nineteenth-century Paris rendered in loving detail even as it is ruthlessly satirized. The narrator discovers the shallowness of a world he had mythologized as a boy in Combray.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Mightier than the Sword: The Legacy of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin

5:45 – 7:45 pm

This class has been cancelled.

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin became a cultural phenomenon soon after it first appeared in the National Era abolitionist newspaper in June 1851, and it has remained an important, although complicated, literary landmark.

Saturday, October 4, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Chicago Women's History, 1870-1930

10 am - Noon

Between 1870 and 1930, Chicago was home to some of the nation’s most important women reformers, including Jane Addams, Frances Willard, and Ida B. Wells. Seminar participants will gain a deeper understanding of the lives and times of six influential Chicago women.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Richard J. Daley: Man and Myth, Life and Legend

6 - 7:30 pm

In this seminar, we examine the many ways in which Richard J. Daley shaped modern Chicago, both physically (expressways, universities, public housing) and metaphysically (in how Chicagoans understand each other and create their sense of identity).

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