"Bkaing resumes after the war, Mons-en-Laonnois, 1919"; Franco-American Museum, Château de Blérancourt
American Women Rebuilding France, 1917 - 1924
"Joan of Arc Saved France" poster. Case Wing oversize D522.25 .W67 1914 no. 1
Chicago, Europe, and the Great War
Front Page, Home Page, and Beyond: News in the...
The Red Cross pictured sentimental images of the Great War's tragic consequences. Case Wing oversize D522.25 .W67 1914 no. 60.
The Great War and the Origins of Humanitarianism...
"Bkaing resumes after the war, Mons-en-Laonnois, 1919"; Franco-American Museum, Château de Blérancourt
"Baking resumes after the war, Mons-en-Laonnois, 1919"; Franco-American Museum, Château de Blérancourt
American Women Rebuilding France, 1917 - 1924 : Presented by the Newberry and the Franco-American Museum, Château de Blérancourt
Wednesday 9/17 to Saturday 1/3

The Newberry is marking the centennial of the start of World War I with two linked exhibitions and a series of related public programs.

"Joan of Arc Saved France" poster. Case Wing oversize D522.25 .W67 1914 no. 1
"Joan of Arc Saved France" poster. Case Wing oversize D522.25 .W67 1914 no. 1
Chicago, Europe, and the Great War
Wednesday 9/17 to Saturday 1/3

The Newberry is marking the centennial of the start of World War I with two linked exhibitions and a series of related public programs.

Front Page, Home Page, and Beyond: News in the 21st Century : Conversations at the Newberry
Tuesday 12/2

The rise of digital technology has revolutionized journalism. Traditional news media worldwide have been challenged to change their business models as readers increasingly rely on digital and social media platforms for their daily news. Can reporters exist in this noisy information environment without sacrificing traditional journalistic standards of integrity and credibility?

The Red Cross pictured sentimental images of the Great War's tragic consequences. Case Wing oversize D522.25 .W67 1914 no. 60.
The Red Cross pictured sentimental images of the Great War's tragic consequences. Case Wing oversize D522.25 .W67 1914 no. 60.
The Great War and the Origins of Humanitarianism, 1918-1924 : An Exhibition Lecture
Thursday 12/4

Bruno Cabanes, a historian of twentieth-century Europe, will give an illustrated talk on the aftermath of the Great War, which brought the most troubled peacetime the world had ever seen. Survivors of the war were not only the soldiers who fought, the wounded in mind and body. They were also the stateless, the children who suffered war’s consequences, and later the victims of the great Russian famine of 1921 to 1923.

Core Collections

Gaylord Watson, Chicago Fire Map. 1871.

Chicago and the Midwest

The collections contain extensive materials on the history of Chicago and the Midwest, including its growth, politics, and eclectic inhabitants.

American History and Culture

The Newberry has deep collections reflecting the breadth of American history and culture through World War One.

Gramhart, Allemodisch Stambuch, Newberry Wing ZP 647. R755, f.15r.

Medieval, Renaissance, and Early Modern Studies

A collection rich in printed and manuscript sources from 1300 to 1800, with strengths in Western Europe and the Americas.

Klaus Stopp, Printed birth and baptismal certificates.

Religion

The Newberry collection for religion focuses on sources from Europe and the Americas, from the late Middle Ages through the early 20th century.

From the Stacks

Pass the Squirrel, Please: Thanksgiving in 1870

While many think of Thanksgiving Day as a timeless American tradition, it did not become the federal holiday celebrated on a late November Thursday until 1863, in the midst of the Civil War. The Newberry's Graff Collection includes the printed menu for the Thanksgiving Day meal served seven years later, on November 24, 1870, at Chicago's Everett House hotel, located at the corner of Clark and Van Buren streets.

The Good Dracula Name

Bram Stoker

The Newberry’s 1899 copy of Dracula was the first American edition of the iconic novel, and the first to depict the Count’s now-notorious castle on its cover. Inside, the pages are uncreased and unmarked—unmarked, that is, save for a letter pasted inside the front cover and written by Bram Stoker himself.