Calendar

E.g., 01/31/2015
E.g., 01/31/2015
Tuesday, February 17, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Our Writing/Ourselves: Women's Writing in the 20th Century

2-4 pm 

This seminar will examine American women’s writing over the last century. We will consider how craft and form affect content by reading samples of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and essays, by authors such as Mary Gaitskill, Zora Neale Hurston, Jhumpa Lahiri, Ursula K. LeGuin, and Adrienne Rich. Participants will examine these texts in terms of their own experiences, goals, and...

Wednesday, February 18, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Medieval Britain 1307-1485 through Historical Fiction

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Explore the Hundred Years War, the Black Death, the Age of Wycliffe, the Peasants’ Revolt, the Wars of the Roses, and other highlights of medieval British history. Rigorously-researched historical novels by P.C. Doherty, Sharon Penman, Candace Robb, Josephine Tey, and others provide an engaging introduction to the period. With the readings as background, we will discuss historical issues

Wednesday, February 18, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Flannery O'Connor and the Agency of Grace

2 - 3:30 pm 

In the work of Flannery O’Connor, the human condition is reduced, often by violent circumstances, to a state in which faith may or may not lead to any kind of salvation or redemption. Freakish tragedies strip O’Connor’s characters of pretention, leaving them in a state of grace—a condition most of them, no doubt, would have preferred to avoid. Following an introduction to southern …

Wednesday, February 18, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Dazzled by the Truth: the World and Work of Franz Kafka, a Modern Jewish Storyteller

6-7:30 pm 

W.H. Auden wrote, “Had one to name the author who comes nearest to bearing the same kind of relation to our age as Dante, Shakespeare and Goethe bore to theirs, Kafka is the first one would think of.” Through a close reading of Kafka’s short stories, and through examination of his life and of early-twentieth-century Prague, we shall attempt to penetrate the seemingly unfathomable...

Wednesday, February 18, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Reading James Joyce's Ulysses

6-7:30 pm 

How does one approach James Joyce’s Ulysses? Reading this literary masterpiece is both like and unlike reading other novels. Through close examination and discussion of the text, we will explore its major themes and concepts, navigate its calm and turbulent sections, and enjoy our journey through the landscape of this fascinating book. Participants will emerge from the seminar …

Thursday, February 19, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus: Existential Literature as Philosophy

5:45 – 7:45 pm

The literary texts of the great French existentialists are perhaps the most effective presentations of their philosophies. Close readings of Jean-Paul Sartre’s Nausea and Albert Camus’ The Stranger will elucidate the themes of existential angst, the absurd, and the possibilities of authentic living and action. Before the first session, please read the Sartre chapter (chapter 10) of...

Tuesday, February 24, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Marcel Proust's Sodom and Gomorrah

6-7:30 pm 

Seminar Description

Wednesday, February 25, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Surrealism and the Second City

6 - 7:30 pm

Seminar Description

Wednesday, February 25, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Victorian Style: British Fashion and Fiction 1850 to 1900

5:45 – 7:45 pm

This seminar will explore dress as a key to character in four iconic Victorian novels (Great Expectations, Lady Audley’s Secret, Far from the Madding Crowd, and The Picture of Dorian Gray). Behind the era’s elaborate etiquette and strict ideas of gender and class, the Victorian dress code allowed and encouraged individuality and eccentricity. As we filter the age through the lens of fashion...

Thursday, February 26, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Endgame or Arcadia? European Drama 1950-present

6 - 7:30 pm 

In this lecture- and discussion-based seminar, we will examine the rich period of European theater from mid-twentieth century to the present. Major themes and movements in European drama during this period will emerge in the existentialism of Samuel Beckett’s Endgame, in the innovations of Tom Stoppard’s Arcadia, and in the comedy of Alan Bennett’s The History Boys. The seminar

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