Event—Scholarly Seminars

Hardeep Dhillon, University of Pennsylvania & Camille Suárez, California State-Los Angeles

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Asian Restriction and the Intimacies of Undocumented Border Crossings

Junta Democrática: Californios’ Rejection of Reconstruction in California

Hardeep Dhillon and Camille Suárez

Asian Restriction and the Intimacies of Undocumented Border Crossings

Hardeep Dhillon, University of Pennsylvania

Through the 1920s, small groups of Indian men began to arrive in Mexican before making their way north to the borderline. Here, they made arrangements with Mexican and Mexican American men who agreed to help them across the border. These new intimacies, underlined by American preoccupations with race, capital, and labor, brought legal and ‘illegal’ (undocumented) immigrants into intimate contact and created new legal structures of surveillance and incrimination. This paper underlines the new intimacies that emerged between Asian, specifically Indian, and Mexican communities on the US-Mexico borderland, and the sociolegal structures that brought them into play.

Junta Democrática: Californios’ Rejection of Reconstruction in California

Camille Suárez, California State-Los Angeles

During the Reconstruction Era, the California State Democratic Party rejected the federal government’s experiment in racial equality. Enacting white supremacist policies, the party limited the rights of non-white residents. Elite Californios– Mexicans of mixed-race descent nationalized by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo – acted against their best interest, by supporting legislation and political platforms limiting the rights of all non-white people in California, including themselves. This paper examines elite Californio’s dual role as a colonized group and state makers, through their collaboration with U.S. settler citizens. I argue that Californio participation was crucial to California’s implementation of racially-exclusive immigration and legal discrimination during Reconstruction.


Respondent: Benjamin H. Johnson, Loyola University Chicago

Registration

This event is free, but all participants must register in advance and space is limited. Please do not request a paper unless you plan to attend.

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About the Borderlands and Latino/a Studies Seminar

The Newberry Borderlands and Latino/a Studies Seminar provides a forum for works-in-progress from scholars and graduate students that explore a variety of topics in the field. Seminars are conversational and free and open to faculty, graduate students, and members of the public, who register in advance to request papers.

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