Programs for the Public | Newberry

Programs for the Public

The Newberry organizes and hosts programs illuminating topics in the humanities, through a variety of formats tailored to the subject at hand: lectures, staged readings, music and dance performances, panel discussions, workshops, and more. Some events are part of ongoing series, such as Conversations at the Newberry, Meet the Author talks, Programs for Genealogists, the weekly Newberry Colloquium, and exhibition-related programming; others are signature annual events, such as the Newberry Book Fair and the Bughouse Square Debates. Additional public programming may be sponsored by the Newberry’s Research Centers.

Most Newberry public programs are free. Seating is limited and registration in advance is required for many events; see the individual listings for details.

Many of our programs are recorded, and you can listen to them on our website.

Upcoming Public Programs

Saturday, February 23, 2019Thursday, November 14, 2019
A series of public programs examining the legacy of the 1919 Chicago race riots
Held at locations across Chicago
Chicago’s 1919 race riots barely register in the city’s current consciousness, yet they were a significant turning point in shaping the racial divides we see today.
Thursday, August 29, 2019
Meet the Author
Meet the Author: Margaret McMullan
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
Join us for a Meet the Author event with Margaret McMullan, who will be discussing her latest book, Where the Angels Lived.
Tuesday, September 10, 2019
Frank Biletz and Julia Denne
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
Join us for a special presentation on Sergei Eisenstein’s 1927 film, October, sponsored by the Adult Education Seminars Program.
Wednesday, September 11, 2019
Newberry Colloquium
A Newberry Colloquium
Free and open to the public; no registration required
Corr-Proust is a new, open-access digital edition of the letters of the French novelist Marcel Proust.
Saturday, September 14, 2019
A Program for Children, with Miss JerFay and Miss Sutton
Free and open to the public; registration requested.
Join Chicago-area drag queens Miss Sutton and Miss Jerfay for stories, songs, and a craft.
Tuesday, September 17, 2019
A new collection of Mexican children’s and youth literature / Evento de presentación de la colección donada por la UNAM a la Newberry Library
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
This event will present a new Newberry collection donated by the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) of award-winning Spanish and Indigenous-language books for children and youth.
Friday, September 20, 2019Tuesday, December 31, 2019
Exhibitions
Often called “the Heartland” or “flyover country,” the Midwest tends to be essentialized as a homogeneous, empty space between the American coasts. This exhibition challenges the assumptions, stereotypes, and persistent narratives about the Midwest, exploring the confluence of peoples and environmental conditions that has defined the region and made it unique.
Tuesday, September 24, 2019
Eve Ewing, Nate Marshall, and Kenneth Warren
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
What words come to mind when you think about Chicago? How did poets and writers in this city develop a voice and a language distinct to the city?
Thursday, September 26, 2019
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
The Forum building was built in 1897 by the architect Samuel A. Treat and contains possibly the oldest hardwood ballroom dance floor in Chicago. This imposing red brick building played a significant role in Bronzeville’s cultural scene by hosting performances of music luminaries and providing space for civic groups and political meetings.
Tuesday, October 1, 2019
Conversations at the Newberry
Rick Kogan and Carol Marin
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
What is the state of news in Chicago today? What has Chicago news become, and where is it headed? In this installment of “Conversations at the Newberry,” Rick Kogan and Carol Marin discuss the broad contours of historical and contemporary journalism in Chicago and reflect on their own experiences as television, radio, and print reporters.
Wednesday, October 2, 2019
Meet the Author
Meet the Author: Simon Balto and Laurence Ralph
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
Join us for a Meet the Author event with Simon Balto and Laurence Ralph, who will converse about their latest work on police violence in Chicago.
Saturday, October 5, 2019
Opening Symposium
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
How can we define “the Midwest”? Is it a delimited geographic region? Does a Midwestern identity exist? What can region tell us that urban/rural or state divides do not?
Thursday, October 10, 2019Friday, October 11, 2019
Center for American Indian Studies Programs
Free and open to the public; registration required
This conference explores the development, use, and afterlife of religious libraries in the Americas.
Saturday, October 12, 2019
Shakespeare Project of Chicago
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
“To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep No more; and, by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, ’tis a consummation
Wednesday, October 23, 2019
Meet the Author
Lee Bey in conversatin with Amanda Williams
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
Join us for a Meet the Author event with photographer Lee Bey and artist Amanda Williams, who will discuss Bey’s latest book, Southern Exposure: The Overlooked Architecture of Chicago’s South Side.
Saturday, October 26, 2019
Colonial History Lecture Series: Mark Peterson
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
Mark Peterson reframes Boston’s early history as the story of the development of an autonomous city-state in the colonial period.
Thursday, November 7, 2019Saturday, November 9, 2019
Center for the History of Cartography Programs
Free and open to the public. Registration required.
1919 was a year of heightened map production around the world. These maps reflect the instability and the experimentation of a world attempting to solve the problems that had led to four years of devastating war. Some cartographers worked to preserve a lasting peace with their maps, while others redrew national boundaries, seeking what some maps had taught them was rightfully theirs.
Tuesday, November 12, 2019
Meet the Author
Meet the Author: Andrew Sandoval-Strausz
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
Join us for a Meet the Author event with Andrew Sandoval-Strausz, who will discuss his latest book, Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City
Tuesday, December 3, 2019
Jill Metcoff and Mike Mossman
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
Jill Metcoff and Mike Mossman will discuss their shared fascination with the Midwestern prairie and the use of intentional fires in maintaining the Midwestern landscape and ecosystem. Bringing together photography, conservation biology, ecology, and personal history, their interdisciplinary work celebrates the union of visual art and scientific method.
Wednesday, December 11, 2019
Chicago's Architectural History in Print
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
Join Chicago architecture aficionados Robert Bruegmann, Kim Coventry, John Ronan, and Pauline Saliga to discuss the significant architecture and urban design projects profiled in Chicago by the Book:101 Publications that Shaped the City and Its Image.
Saturday, December 14, 2019
A theatrical reading by the Shakespeare Project of Chicago
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
Join us for a special holiday-themed morning, with traditional carols, a special holiday performance, and free hot chocolate and treats.