Programs and Events | Newberry

Programs and Events

The Newberry offers programming in the humanities for scholars, teachers, and the general public. Unless otherwise noted, events are free, and no reservations are required. Many of our programs are recorded, and you can listen to them on our website.

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E.g., 10/29/2020
E.g., 10/29/2020
Friday, October 9, 2020Friday, May 7, 2021
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
This seminar provides an interdisciplinary, supportive community for graduate students in the early stages of dissertation preparation. Gender plays a critical role in understanding, displaying, and experiencing modes of power across a wide range of cultural activities, ca. 1100-1700.
Thursday, October 22, 2020Thursday, October 29, 2020
This virtual symposium is free and open to the public. Space for some events will be limited, and priority will be given to scholars from CRS consortium institutions.
Friday, October 30, 2020
A virtual conversation with Susan Dackerman (Stanford University) and Pedro Raposo (Adler Planetarium)
In this virtual conversation, Renaissance print scholar Susan Dackerman and historian of science Pedro Raposo will discuss the workings of early modern scientific instruments and their depiction on paper.
Friday, November 13, 2020Tuesday, April 13, 2021
The Center for Renaissance Studies (CRS) is pleased to announce a new series of virtual conversations on premodern critical race studies and Indigenous studies. Each hour-long session will feature a conversation between scholars across professional generations about foundational works and the current state of the field. See below for a full list of session topics and speakers.
Friday, December 4, 2020
This workshop will focus on the Mississippi Bubble, a global financial disaster in 1720.
Thursday, December 17, 2020
Dante Lecture
This virtual talk will examine the shift in late medieval devotion and spirituality to the affective consideration of and participation to the sufferings of Christ on the Cross (Christus patiens).
Monday, January 4, 2021Monday, March 8, 2021
Ten-Week Graduate Seminar
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
This virtual course will introduce you to methods, approaches, uses, and challenges of digital humanities with respect to the study of medieval and early modern cultures. Over the past few decades, scholars in all fields of medieval and early modern studies have increasingly used digital resources to study and teach the premodern past.
Friday, January 15, 2021
The 1939 Strike and the Origins of Chrysler Exceptionalism, Steve Rosswurm