Programs and Events | Newberry

Programs and Events

The Newberry offers programming in the humanities for scholars, teachers, and the general public. Unless otherwise noted, events are free, and no reservations are required. Many of our programs are recorded, and you can listen to them on our website.

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E.g., 12/07/2019
E.g., 12/07/2019
Friday, October 4, 2019Friday, May 1, 2020
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Meeting four times over the year, this seminar aims to form an interdisciplinary community of graduate students in the early stages of writing their dissertations, with an eye toward examining
Saturday, January 11, 2020
Shakespeare Project of Chicago
Free and open to all. Reserve your free tickets now.
A story of greed, ambition, and ruthlessness, Shakespeare’s Richard III tells the story of its eponymous antihero’s rise and fall from power.
Thursday, January 16, 2020Thursday, April 2, 2020
This seminar examines early modern European modes of knowledge-production by zeroing in on the idea of the “elemental.” From geometry to medicine and alchemy, almanacs and handbooks of prognostication to natural history (including colonial natural history), the Newberry’s collection includes books that deploy the notion of an “element” (and the “elemental” or even the “elementary”) in many diff
Thursday, January 23, 2020Saturday, January 25, 2020
The Center for Renaissance Studies’ annual graduate student conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for emerging scholars to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across the field of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies in Europe, the Americas, and the Mediterranean world.
Saturday, February 22, 2020
Shakespeare Project of Chicago
Free and open to all. Reserve your free ticket starting Jan. 2.
Shakespeare’s drama of feuding families and star-crossed lovers established the template for romantic tragedy.
Friday, March 6, 2020
The aims of this proposed workshop are two-fold: to provide an introduction and overview of a growing scholarly engagement with Anglo-Muslim relations from the mid-sixteenth to the late seventeenth centuries as represented in a selected body of English texts: plays, travel texts, histories, religious and propaganda pamphlets, Atlases, and maps; and more specifically to guide a close micro-readi