Center for Renaissance Studies Programs | Newberry

Center for Renaissance Studies Programs

Pentecost

Pentecost. Case MS 185, f. 10

The Center for Renaissance Studies works with an international consortium of universities in North America and Europe. It offers a wide range of scholarly programs and digital and print publications based in the Newberry collections, and provides a locus for a community of scholars who come from all over the world to use the library’s early manuscripts, printed books, and other materials.


Faculty and graduate students from consortium institutions may be eligible to apply for Newberry Renaissance Consortium Grants to travel to the Newberry to attend programs or do research. Through our reciprocal arrangement with the Folger Institute in Washington, D.C., which also works with a consortium of universities, Institute seminar fees are waived for faculty and graduate students at Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies schools upon acceptance of application.


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Upcoming Programs

Friday, October 5, 2018Friday, April 26, 2019
Renaissance Graduate Programs
This seminar will examine the material text in Europe, from the later Middle Ages through the early modern period (1300–1700). We will consider the production and circulation of manuscripts and early printed books, with a broad focus: we will range across descriptive bibliography (i.e.
Friday, April 26, 2019
Premodern Studies Seminar
European Christianity in the Age of Paper
Saturday, April 27, 2019
Eighteenth-Century Seminar
Where are the Animals in the History of Sexuality?
Saturday, April 27, 2019
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Research Methods Workshop for Graduate Students and Junior Faculty
The goal of the workshop is to introduce graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and junior faculty to research methodologies involved in studying the codicology of European manuscripts - the material aspects of books made by hand between 1200 and 1500.
Thursday, May 2, 2019Friday, May 3, 2019
What was new in the renaissance? What were some of the catalysts for change? How did globalization affect technology in the early modern period?
Friday, May 10, 2019
Seminar in European Art
Lisa Pons: / Simone Zurawski: Architecture and Urban Development in the Reign of Louis XIV Reconsidered: Paris in the Aftermath of the Fronde
Saturday, May 11, 2019
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
Shakespeare Project of Chicago
Free and open to the public; registration recommended.
That disease Of which all old men sicken,—avarice. A theatrical reading by professional actors from The Shakespeare Project of Chicago, directed by Peter Garino.
Saturday, May 18, 2019
Milton Seminar
Unlearning Value: Praise, Risk, and Repetition in Paradise Lost
Monday, July 8, 2019Friday, July 26, 2019
Mellon Summer Institutes in Vernacular Paleography
At the Newberry Library
This three-week institute will offer intensive training in the accurate reading and transcription of handwritten Italian vernacular texts from the late medieval though the early modern periods. The instruction is intended to enable scholars in various fields of specialization to acquire the skills to work with primary sources.
Thursday, October 3, 2019Thursday, December 5, 2019
Renaissance Graduate Programs
This fast-paced course prepares students from a variety of fields in medieval and early modern studies to read and do research using texts in Catalan. Students will work on reading comprehension skills, grammar, and vocabulary, and will also be introduced to translation strategies. Students will use texts in their own disciplines in project-based activities using the Newberry’s collections.
Friday, October 4, 2019Friday, May 1, 2020
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Meeting four times over the year, this seminar aims to form an interdisciplinary community of graduate students in the early stages of writing their dissertations, with an eye toward examining
Saturday, October 12, 2019
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Offered in conjunction with the “Reading the Ministry in the Americas” conference, this workshop will explore the concept of digital libraries and their applications to the study of the premodern world.
Friday, November 15, 2019
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Classical, medieval, and early modern studies have always relied on the work of library professionals. This workshop is designed to introduce participants to the contributions catalogers, archivists, curators, and conservators have made to our understanding of the premodern world, which go well beyond the practical work necessary to make primary and secondary sources accessible for scholars.
Friday, March 6, 2020
Renaissance Graduate Programs
The aims of this proposed workshop are two-fold: to provide an introduction and overview of a growing scholarly engagement with Anglo-Muslim relations from the mid-sixteenth to the late seventeenth centuries as represented in a selected body of English texts: plays, travel texts, histories, religious and propaganda pamphlets, Atlases, and maps; and more specifically to guide a close micro-readi
Friday, April 24, 2020
Renaissance Graduate Programs
In conjunction with Professor Walter Melion’s lecture at the Newberry, “Meditating the Unbearable in a Customized Fifteenth-Century Prayerbook,” and a conference at Emory University, this workshop will explore the phenomenon of hybrid and composite books in the medieval and early modern periods.