Graduate Programs | Newberry

Graduate Programs

Book of Hours

Book of Hours, Bruges, c. 1455. Case MS 35.

The Center for Renaissance Studies hosts four major kinds of programs especially for students in master’s or Ph.D. programs in any discipline of medieval, Renaissance, or early modern studies: our annual multidisciplinary graduate student conference; an annual dissertation seminar; one-day research methods workshops; and ten-week graduate seminars held at the Newberry, for which students can earn academic credit at their home institutions. Enrollment is by competitive application, with priority given to students from Center for Renaissance Studies consortium institutions.

Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference

The annual conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for graduate students to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across the field of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies.

Participants from a wide variety of disciplines find a supportive and collegial forum for their work, meet future colleagues from other institutions and disciplines, and become familiar with the Newberry and its resources. See Publications for links to peer-edited online conference proceedings from the 2007 through 2015 conferences.

Dissertation Seminars

The Center hosts an annual dissertation seminar, led by top medieval, Renaissance, and early modern scholars. The seminars are open by competitive application to ABD students at consortium schools who are toward the beginning of their dissertation research. Meeting on Friday afternoons approximately four times, the seminar focuses on methods and comparisons, and provides comments and criticisms from a larger group of specialists than are available on any single campus.

One-Day Research Methods Workshops

These workshops, led by top consortium scholars, provide students near the beginning of their graduate school careers with an introduction to valuable theoretical or methodological approaches, and expose them to working at a research library, through the lens of a particular topic.

Ten-Week Graduate Seminars

We host ten-week graduate seminars, for which participants may earn credit at their home institutions, on a variety of topics. See Graduate Seminars for details about how to apply and information about upcoming seminars.

Propose to Teach a Center for Renaissance Studies Graduate Program

We send a Call for Proposals each fall to faculty members at consortium institutions, soliciting proposals for ten-week graduate seminars and one-day research methods workshops. See Proposing a Graduate Program for more information.

Note: Graduate students of Center for Renaissance Studies member universities may be eligible to apply for Newberry Renaissance Consortium Grants to attend CRS programs or to do research at the Newberry. Each member university sets its own policies and deadlines; contact your Representative Council member in advance for details.

Past Graduate Programs

Upcoming Events (See also Graduate Seminars, above)

Thursday, October 3, 2019Thursday, December 5, 2019
Renaissance Graduate Programs
This fast-paced course prepares students from a variety of fields in medieval and early modern studies to read and do research using texts in Catalan. Students will work on reading comprehension skills, grammar, and vocabulary, and will also be introduced to translation strategies. Students will use texts in their own disciplines in project-based activities using the Newberry’s collections.
Friday, October 4, 2019Friday, May 1, 2020
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Meeting four times over the year, this seminar aims to form an interdisciplinary community of graduate students in the early stages of writing their dissertations, with an eye toward examining
Friday, November 15, 2019
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Classical, medieval, and early modern studies have always relied on the work of library professionals. This workshop is designed to introduce participants to the contributions catalogers, archivists, curators, and conservators have made to our understanding of the premodern world, which go well beyond the practical work necessary to make primary and secondary sources accessible for scholars.
Thursday, January 16, 2020Thursday, April 2, 2020
Renaissance Graduate Programs
This seminar examines early modern European modes of knowledge-production by zeroing in on the idea of the “elemental.” From geometry to medicine and alchemy, almanacs and handbooks of prognostication to natural history (including colonial natural history), the Newberry’s collection includes books that deploy the notion of an “element” (and the “elemental” or even the “elementary”) in many diff
Thursday, January 23, 2020Saturday, January 25, 2020
The Center for Renaissance Studies’ annual graduate student conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for emerging scholars to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across the field of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies in Europe, the Americas, and the Mediterranean world.
Friday, March 6, 2020
Renaissance Graduate Programs
The aims of this proposed workshop are two-fold: to provide an introduction and overview of a growing scholarly engagement with Anglo-Muslim relations from the mid-sixteenth to the late seventeenth centuries as represented in a selected body of English texts: plays, travel texts, histories, religious and propaganda pamphlets, Atlases, and maps; and more specifically to guide a close micro-readi
Friday, April 24, 2020
Renaissance Graduate Programs
In conjunction with Professor Walter Melion’s lecture at the Newberry, “Meditating the Unbearable in a Customized Fifteenth-Century Prayerbook,” and a conference at Emory University, this workshop will explore the phenomenon of hybrid and composite books in the medieval and early modern periods.