Graduate Programs | Newberry

Graduate Programs

Book of Hours

Book of Hours, Bruges, c. 1455. Case MS 35.

The Center for Renaissance Studies hosts four major kinds of programs especially for students in master’s or Ph.D. programs in any discipline of medieval, Renaissance, or early modern studies: our annual multidisciplinary graduate student conference; an annual fall dissertation seminar; one-day research methods workshops; and ten-week graduate seminars held at the Newberry, for which students can earn academic credit at their home institutions. Enrollment is by competitive application, with priority given to students from Center for Renaissance Studies consortium institutions.

Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference

The annual conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for graduate students to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across the field of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies.

Participants from a wide variety of disciplines find a supportive and collegial forum for their work, meet future colleagues from other institutions and disciplines, and become familiar with the Newberry and its resources. See Publications for links to peer-edited online conference proceedings from the 2007 through 2015 conferences.

Dissertation Seminars

The Center hosts an annual one-semester dissertation seminar, led by top medieval, Renaissance, and early modern scholars. The seminars are open by competitive application to ABD students at consortium schools who are toward the beginning of their dissertation research. Meeting on Friday afternoons approximately once a month each fall, the seminar focuses on methods and comparisons, and provides comments and criticisms from a larger group of specialists than are available on any single campus.

One-Day Research Methods Workshops

These workshops, led by top consortium scholars, provide students near the beginning of their graduate school careers with an introduction to valuable theoretical or methodological approaches, and expose them to working at a research library, through the lens of a particular topic.

Ten-Week Graduate Seminars

We host ten-week graduate seminars, for which participants may earn credit at their home institutions, on a variety of topics. See Graduate Seminars for details about how to apply and information about upcoming seminars.

Propose to Teach a Center for Renaissance Studies Graduate Program

We send a Call for Proposals each fall to faculty members at consortium institutions, soliciting proposals for ten-week graduate seminars and one-day research methods workshops. See Proposing a Graduate Program for more information.

Note: Graduate students of Center for Renaissance Studies member universities may be eligible to apply for Newberry Renaissance Consortium Grants to attend CRS programs or to do research at the Newberry. Each member university sets its own policies and deadlines; contact your Representative Council member in advance for details.

Past Graduate Programs

Upcoming Events (See also Graduate Seminars, above)

Friday, September 16, 2016Friday, December 9, 2016
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Applications accepted through July 1
This special seminar is devoted to creating a broad-based community of graduate students who are at the beginning stages of working on their dissertations in the history of Europe or the Atlantic World, c. 1400-c. 1750. The goal will be to provide comments and criticisms from a larger group of specialists than would be available on any single campus.
Thursday, September 29, 2016Thursday, December 8, 2016
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Ten-week graduate seminar
Application deadline September 1
This course will examine the relationship between gender, sex differences, and politics—defined broadly—in medieval Europe, exploring the ways in which systems of power mapped onto perceived sex differences and bolstered, reproduced, or authenticated those systems.
Friday, October 14, 2016
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Research Methods Workshop for Early-Career Graduate Students
Application deadline September 1
The field of eighteenth‐century Shakespeare has recently received renewed attention with the publication of the essay collection Shakespeare in the Eighteenth Century (Fiona Ritchie and Peter Sabor, eds.) by Cambridge University Press (2012), Michael Caines’s volume for the Oxford Shakespeare Topics series (2013) and conference sessions at the American Society for Eighteenth‐Century St
Thursday, January 26, 2017Saturday, January 28, 2017
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Submission deadline: October 16, 2016.
The Center for Renaissance Studies’ annual graduate student conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for emerging scholars to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across the field of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies in Europe, the Americas, and the Mediterranean world.
Friday, March 3, 2017
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Research Methods Workshop for Early-Career Graduate Students
The application deadline is December 1.
The works of Margaret Cavendish, in both physical and digital form, will serve as the subject matter for this introduction to digital humanities tools and methods. Cavendish’s work has been digitized in the EEBO and Chadwyck-Healy databases, but to our knowledge automated text analysis of her work has not to date been done.
Saturday, March 11, 2017
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Research Methods Workshop for Early-Career Graduate Students
Application deadline December 1
This workshop aims to introduce participants to the practices and contexts of early modern printing, the central themes related to the reception of classical literary criticism, and the key debates which occurred in early modern Italy—crucial issues not only for students of early modern Italian literature, but for all European national traditions, many of whose literary theoretical writings in