Programs and Events | Newberry

Programs and Events

The Newberry offers programming in the humanities for scholars, teachers, and the general public. Unless otherwise noted, events are free, and no reservations are required.

E.g., 03/25/2017
E.g., 03/25/2017
Friday, January 20, 2017Saturday, April 15, 2017
African American Kentucky through the Lens of Helen Balfour Morrison, 1935-1946
Chicago-area photographer Helen Balfour Morrison is largely unknown today, but she created an impressive body of photographs documenting African American life in Depression-era Kentucky. Beginning in 1935, Morrison traveled to the Inner Bluegrass region near Lexington, Kentucky, where she photographed the residents of two small African American communities, Zion Hill and Sugar Hill.
Monday, March 20, 2017Friday, June 16, 2017
The Chicago Calligraphy Collective was founded in 1976 to promote the study, practice, and appreciation of calligraphy in all its historical and present-day applications. This annual juried exhibition of members’ work includes handmade artists’ books and broadsides alongside three-dimensional works executed in a variety of media and styles.
Tuesday, March 28, 2017
Presented by Chicago Collections Consortium and the Newberry Library
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
Learn about little-known aspects of the history of city planning in Chicago, drawing on the breadth and depth of resources available through the Chicago Collections Consortium. Chicago and city planning have a long history, one that extends well beyond Daniel Burnham and Edward Bennett’s 1909 Plan of Chicago.
Wednesday, March 29, 2017
A Newberry Colloquium
Please join us for the Newberry’s Fourth Annual Edible Book Festival!
Saturday, April 1, 2017
Colonial History Lecture Series
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
Please join Andrew Lipman as he discusses his recent book, The Saltwater Frontier, a previously untold story of how the ocean became a “frontier” between colonists and Indians. When the English and Dutch empires both tried to claim the same patch of coast between the Hudson River and Cape Cod, the sea itself became the arena of contact and conflict.
Tuesday, April 4, 2017
Please register by 10 am Monday, April 3, 2017
“What Dante Means to Me” is the title of an essay by T.S. Eliot published in his To Criticize the Critic, originally given as a lecture. 2016 recipient of the prestigious Balzan Prize Boitani has adopted Eliot’s title to indicate that he, too, will reconstruct the story of his own relationship with Dante.
Wednesday, April 5, 2017
Chicago Studies Program
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
As part of a citywide celebration of Gwendolyn Brooks marking the one-hundredth anniversary of her birth, the Newberry will gather poets, scholars, historians, and archivists to discuss the historical context of Brooks’ groundbreaking first book of poems, A Street in Bronzeville.
Wednesday, April 5, 2017
A Newberry Colloquium
Tracing the development of Katherine Mansfield’s short story, “Poison” (1920), from the manuscript to the typescript, this presentation will draw on Mansfield’s life and letters and use close textual analysis to illuminate veiled allusions to Robert Browning’s “My Last Duchess,” allusions that suggest she sought not only to undermine Browning’s overbearing Duke but also
Thursday, April 6, 2017
A Memorial Tribute Concert for Norman Pellegrini
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
Created by Donald Knight, this year’s Faces of Love concert will feature music by Brahms, Verdi, Ned Rorem, and Stephen Sondheim, beautifully performed by Erich Buchholz (tenor), Alex Honzen (baritone), Kimberly McCord (soprano), and special assisting artist, Marcie Tilkin (soprano).
Wednesday, April 12, 2017
A Newberry Colloquium
This colloquium is based on a book project that comparatively examines how cities in China and India have become strategic terrains for the remaking of citizen rights. The book is based on historical-comparative analyses and ethnographic fieldwork on land grabs, slum evictions, and clean-air campaigns in five urban regions in China and India (Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Beijing, and Guangzhou).
Wednesday, April 12, 2017
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
“Zion Hill: Envisioning a Black Future” will frame the photographs of Helen Morrison, by offering some background on Black life in Kentucky. Zion Hill was one of many Black towns established after the Civil War. Freedom meant envisioning a future for themselves and their children outside of slavery. Zion Hill was rooted in African American religion and the search for a Promised Land.
Tuesday, April 18, 2017
William Apess and John Norton in the War of 1812
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
This talk by Drew Lopenzina tracks the extraordinary experiences of two “Writing Indians” in the War of 1812, bringing new biographical information to bear on their lives. One, William Apess (Pequot), fought on the U.S.
Saturday, April 22, 2017
A Meet the Author Program
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
The adoption of firearms by American Indians between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries marked a turning point in the history of North America’s indigenous peoples—a cultural earthquake so profound that its impact has yet to be adequately measured.