Programs and Events | Newberry

Programs and Events

The Newberry offers programming in the humanities for scholars, teachers, and the general public. Unless otherwise noted, events are free, and no reservations are required. Many of our programs are recorded, and you can listen to them on our website.

E.g., 04/24/2017
E.g., 04/24/2017
Monday, March 20, 2017Friday, June 16, 2017
The Chicago Calligraphy Collective was founded in 1976 to promote the study, practice, and appreciation of calligraphy in all its historical and present-day applications. This annual juried exhibition of members’ work includes handmade artists’ books and broadsides alongside three-dimensional works executed in a variety of media and styles.
Wednesday, April 26, 2017
A Meet the Author Program
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
One hundred years ago, Bohemian author and editor of the radical Masses magazine, Floyd Dell, began a passionate affair with a newcomer to Greenwich Village—the yet to be discovered “girl poet,” Edna St. Vincent Millay. In the years that followed, both Dell and Millay became symbols of early twentieth century feminism, rebellion, and literary freedom.
Wednesday, April 26, 2017
A Newberry Colloquium
In colonial Mexico saint images served as patrons of a variety of communities and associations, including confraternities, mines, towns and cities, villages, churches, and domestic spaces. What did this model of territorial patronage mean for communities of salt producers and consumers?
Saturday, April 29, 2017
An Early Modern Studies Symposium
Please register by 10 am Friday, April 28, 2017
Twitter hashtag for the symposium: #NLEM17
Saturday, April 29, 2017
Free and open to the public; registration in advance required
Join us for a performance with commentary of late fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century Italian popular secular music.
Thursday, May 4, 2017
Chicago Studies Program
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
Ring Lardner (March 6, 1885-Sept. 25, 1933) will be inducted into the Chicago Literary Hall of Fame at the Newberry Library.
Saturday, May 6, 2017
Please register by 10 am Friday, May 5, 2017
Analyzing Durer’s 1514 engraving Saint Jerome in his Study, Brian Cummings suggests that the intellectual world of the early modern period is “poised between the clarity of faith and the melancholy of skepticism.” What transforms skepticism into faith and overwhelms the fear of mutability or contingency is grace.
Saturday, May 6, 2017
Free and open to the public; no tickets or registration required
“From women’s eyes this doctrine I derive: They sparkle still the right Promethean fire; They are the books, the arts, the academes, That show, contain, and nourish all the world.”
Thursday, May 11, 2017
Chicago Studies Program
Free and open to the public; no registration required.
Fanny Butcher (September 13, 1888 - May 11, 1987), for four decades a writer and critic for the Chicago Tribune, will be inducted into the Chicago Literary Hall of Fame at the Newberry Library.
Friday, May 12, 2017Saturday, May 13, 2017
Free and open to the public; registration required.
Recognizing the reality of war and massacre, this scholarly symposium takes new approaches to examining violence in past and present-day Native communities by engaging the intersections of a broad array of themes, including:
Wednesday, May 17, 2017
Isabel Wilkerson and James Grossman on the Great Migration, Then and Now
Free and open to the public; no registration required
In this installment of “Conversations at the Newberry,” Isabel Wilkerson, Pulitzer Prize winning author of The Warmth of Other Suns, and James Grossman, author of Land of Hope: Chicago, Black Southerners, and the Great Migration and Executive Director of the American Historical Association