D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies Programs | Newberry

D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies Programs

D'Arcy McNickle. NL Archives 15-01-01 Bx.#2

D’Arcy McNickle. NL Archives 15-01-01 Bx.#2

The D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies draws on the Newberry’s remarkable collections in American Indian and indigenous studies and the resources of the center to support its mission and offer programs to scholars, teachers, tribal historians, and others interested in the field. The center sponsors the American Indian Studies Seminar Series, which gathers scholars in the library to discuss papers based on work in progress.

In June 2008, the Newberry inaugurated the Newberry Consortium in American Indian Studies. The consortium offers an annual workshop, summer institute, conference, as well as fellowships to graduate students and faculty at member institutions. Learn more about the American Indian Studies Seminar Series, the NCAIS Spring Workshop in Research Methods, the NCAIS Graduate Student Conference, and the NCAIS Summer Institute.

The D’Arcy McNickle Center frequently hosts summer institutes exploring topics in American Indian and Indigenous Studies. Funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, these institutes feature guest lecturers in American Indian studies, American history, art history, and literature, as well as Newberry staff experts in American Indian materials in several collections, including visual arts and cartography. Learn more about the NEH Summer Programs.

Upcoming Programs

Thursday, April 28, 2016
Center for American Indian Studies Programs
The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) was enacted in November 1990 to address the rights of Indian tribes and Native Hawaiian organizations to Native American cultural items, including human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony.
Wednesday, May 11, 2016
American Indian Studies Seminar Series
In the 1730s, two half-brothers, one Dakota and one Ojibwe, unknowingly confronted each other one morning during an attack. In a desperate attempt to stop the fighting, the Ojibwe brother called out asking if his brother was among the Dakota firing on his hunting camp. With the recognition of their shared kinship, the hostilities were halted and the warring bands welcomed each other as family.