D'Arcy McNickle Center Fellowships

Frederick Gokliz. Ink and Watercolor Drawings of Apache Indians.
Frederick Gokliz. Ink and Watercolor Drawings of Apache Indians. ca. 1894-99. Vault Oversize Ayer Art Gokliz, Drawing no. 6.

The center offers several long and short-term fellowships to scholars pursuing research at the Newberry. See Fellowships for information about deadlines and how to apply.

Frances C Allen Fellowship for Women of American Indian Heritage

This fellowship is intended to encourage women of American Indian heritage in their studies of any field related to the Newberry’s collections. First awarded in 1983, the fellowships were established in 1980 by will of Frances Cornelia Wolfe Allen (1894-1980). A strong advocate of education, Allen became interested in the Newberry’s programs after her 1977 and 1978 visits, while her daughter, Helen Hornbeck Tanner, was director of the Atlas of Great Lakes Indian History Project.

Susan Kelly Power and Helen Hornbeck Tanner Fellowship

This fellowship for PhD candidates and postdoctoral scholars of American Indian heritage supports up to two months of residential research in any field in the humanities, using the collections of the Newberry.

This fellowship was established in 2002 by an anonymous donor to encourage research by American Indian scholars and honor two notable advocates for American Indian education. Susan Kelly Power (Yanktonai Dakota) is a historian, activist, and long-time participant in programs of the D’Arcy McNickle Center. She was a founding member and four-time chair of Chicago’s American Indian Center. Helen Hornbeck Tanner served as acting director of the D’Arcy McNickle Center, director of the Atlas of Great Lakes Indian History Project, and an expert witness and historical consultant for several tribes. She was also a senior research fellow at the Newberry.

Newberry Consortium in American Indian Studies Faculty Fellowship

The fellowship will provide support for one semester in residence at the Newberry for a consortium faculty member at institutions participating in the Newberry Consortium in American Indian Studies (NCAIS). Preference is given to scholars at an early career stage. Fellows will work on a project in American Indian Studies requiring research in the Newberry’s collections. The NCAIS Faculty Fellow will receive a research carrel and be accorded the same privileges as other Newberry long-term fellows. The Faculty Fellow will present research, participate in both the McNickle Center Seminar in American Indian and Indigenous Studies and the Newberry Library Fellows’ Seminar, and be available to NCAIS Graduate Student Fellows for consultation.

Newberry Consortium in American Indian Studies Graduate Student Fellowships

These fellowships offer support for between one and two months of dissertation research and carry stipends for doctoral candidates at institutions participating in the Newberry Consortium in American Indian Studies (NCAIS). Graduate Fellows will be offered individual research space at the Newberry and accorded the same privileges as other Newberry short-term fellows. Awards may also be used to fund research in other libraries, archives, or in the field. Fellowship recipients are expected to present their research at the consortium’s annual graduate student conference or at a Newberry-sponsored seminar in American Indian and indigenous studies.

Download NCAIS Fellowships and Frances C Allen and Power-Tanner Fellowships flyers.