Programs and Events | Newberry

Programs and Events

The Newberry offers programming in the humanities for scholars, teachers, and the general public. Unless otherwise noted, events are free, and no reservations are required. Many of our programs are recorded, and you can listen to them on our website.

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E.g., 09/22/2019
E.g., 09/22/2019
Thursday, October 3, 2019Thursday, December 5, 2019
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
This fast-paced course prepares students from a variety of fields in medieval and early modern studies to read and do research using texts in Catalan. Students will work on reading comprehension skills, grammar, and vocabulary, and will also be introduced to translation strategies. Students will use texts in their own disciplines in project-based activities using the Newberry’s collections.
Friday, October 4, 2019Friday, May 1, 2020
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Meeting four times over the year, this seminar aims to form an interdisciplinary community of graduate students in the early stages of writing their dissertations, with an eye toward examining
Thursday, October 10, 2019Friday, October 11, 2019
Free and open to the public; registration required
This conference explores the development, use, and afterlife of religious libraries in the Americas.
Saturday, October 12, 2019
Shakespeare Project of Chicago
Free and open to the public; free tickets required.
“To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them? To die: to sleep No more; and, by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, ’tis a consummation
Saturday, October 12, 2019
Offered in conjunction with the “Reading the Ministry in the Americas” conference, this workshop will explore the concept of digital libraries and their applications to the study of the premodern world.
Friday, November 15, 2019
Classical, medieval, and early modern studies have always relied on the work of library professionals. This workshop is designed to introduce participants to the contributions catalogers, archivists, curators, and conservators have made to our understanding of the premodern world, which go well beyond the practical work necessary to make primary and secondary sources accessible for scholars.